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SchmoozeDance at Park City

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JewishFilm.com

SchmoozeDance
Schedule 2003

SchmoozeDance Film Festival 2003
And our Park City Film Diary 2003

JewishFILM.com will co-sponsor and screen Jewish films in association with the Park City Jewish community and Congregation Temple Har Shalom of Park City on January 17, 2003. It will be held during the same week as the Sundance and Slamdance Film Festivals.

The plans are being firmed up and additions, corrections, times, and locations will be added to this page.

If you have a Jewish video which didn't make it into the highly selective Sundance, Slamdance, NoDance, etc. festivals, please send us an email at Jewfilm@aol.com
Maybe we can make a shidduch?


[harshalom]







Schmoozedance2003 schedule:

Friday, January 17, 2003:
Beshalach-Shabbat Shira.

7:30 PM - Oneg Shabbat at Temple Har Shalom in Park City

8:15 PM - A Kiddush and reception for congregants, filmmakers, tourists, distributors and everybody else visiting or residing in Park City and Utah

8:45 PM – Let the films begin.
Location: Temple Har Shalom, 1922 Prospector Ave, Park City, Utah, across from Prospector Square, near the Grub Steak House. Service led by the Temple Har Shalom congregation and Rabbi Joshua Aaronson.

See films below:


THE NOSE JOB JEW. Director: Micah Smith. USA, 2001. The fun and confusion begins when a young Jewish guy, who doesn’t look Jewish, starts dating a Jewish girl, who doesn’t like Jewish guys. A cutting-edge comedy that comments on reality and perception. 5 min. Source of print: Micah Smith at MSmith@JewishCulture.ORG or Info@VAGfilms.com

KOSHER. director: Aimee Barth. USA 2002. Six year old Charles wants to "marry" his sweetheart on the playground after school but there's one problem: he's Christian and she's Jewish. 5 min. Source of print: FSU Film School KBarber@filmschool.fsu.edu

WONTONS AND HAMENTASCHEN. director: Emily Ann Frumkin. USA 1996. Two doting. eccentric mothers, one Asian, one Jewish, knead and chop their way through a mix of emotions in preparation for the half baked idea that their children are suddenly getting married. With Louise Kahn, Sue Stamper, David Wang and Abner Wang. 10 min. Source of print: FSU Film School KBarber@filmschool.fsu.edu

SCHMATTE MAZEL. Director: Lesley Sharon Rosenthal. Australia 2002. This fanciful documentary traces the legacy of the Australian shmatte (garment) industry. 10 min. Source of print: Rose-1@rocketmail.com

THE COLLECTOR OF BEDFORD STREET. Director: Alice Elliot. 2002. USA. Larry Selman, a 59-year-old mentally retarded activist in New York's Greenwich Village, has raised over $125,000 for local charities. But he has an IQ of 61, and his caregiver is aging and becoming infirmed. To ensure Larry's future in the neighborhood, his neighbors rally to create a community trust fund for him. 34 min. Source: ElliotGirl@aol.com

THE JOEL FILES. Director: Beate Thalberg. Austria, 2001. English and German with English subtitles. US Premiere at SchmoozeDance 2003. This is the history of the family of the musician Billy Joel - their escape from Nazi Germany and Austria and their return to discover the past. Billy Joel's grandfather's company was "Aryanized" in 1938 and became a great success under the new owner. The bitter entanglement of the two families and the third generation's eventual attempt at reconciliation form the basis of this powerful film. 60 min. Source of print: bthalberg@hotmail.com

A SYSTEM FOR WRITING THANK YOU NOTES. Director: Neil Goldberg. USA, 2001. In an uncomfortably humorous "interview," Goldberg's widowed father reveals his method for responding to condolence cards received after his wife's death. 9 min. USA, 2001. Source of print: Neil@NeilGoldberg.com

A HOME ON THE RANGE. THE JEWISH CHICKEN RANCHERS OF PETALUMA. Directors: Bonnie Burt and Judith Montell. USA, 2002. English/Yiddish w/subtitles. Yes, Jewish chicken ranchers! Directors Bonnie Burt and Judith Montell document the story of the Jews who fled the pogroms and hardships of Eastern Europe and traveled to California to become chicken ranchers. Even in the sweatshops of New York, word spread about the town of Petaluma where the Jews were not shopkeepers and professionals, but farmers. Jack London, California vigilantes, McCarthyism, the Cold War, and agribusiness all figure into this American saga of an immigrant group finding a new home on the range. Fractious, idealistic, and intrepid, these Jewish chicken ranchers confronted the challenges of being Jewish and American. 52 Min. Source of print: MarBon@aol.com

JACOB’S GIFT. Director: Stephen J. Abronson. USA. 2002. English. A Jewish man living under Roman rule loses his wife to a Roman sword, and must decide whether to trust an angel with an unknown, and possibly nefarious, agenda. Source of print: www.Abronson.com



Saturday, January 18, 2003:
Shabbat. No plans

Sunday, January 19, 2003:
Tu B’Shvat seder in SLC at the JCC

Monday, January 20, 2003:
Martin Luther King Day, Jr Day


SchmoozeDance is a fan of other film festivals, and we support the official sponsors of those festivals. Jewish Films and Films of Jewish Interest that are being screened at Sundance and Slamdance in January 2003, include:

AMERICAN SPLENDOR: Directed by Shari Springer Berman & Robert Pulcini. An original mix of fiction and reality illuminates the life of comic book hero everyman Harvey Pekar. CAST: Paul Giamatti, Hope Davis, Judah Friedlander

CAPTURING THE FRIEDMANS. A documentary directed by Andrew Jarecki (the guy who started 777 FILM. A FAMILY IS CAPTURED on film. Capturing the Friedmans explores the nature of family relations through the prism of the strange and tragic true story of an American family indicted for sex crimes against children, in Great Neck NY, after the father and son are accused of shocking crimes. The media eats this story up, but a lot of the best footage was shot by the family themselves. What is the truth? Whose perspective do you believe? Does the legal system really find the truth? January 17 (5:30), January 18 (midnight), January 20, 22, and 24, 2003

THE WEATHER UNDERGROUND. A documentary directed by Sam Green & Bill Siegel. The remarkable story of The Weather Underground, radical activists of the 1960s, and of radical politics at its best and most disastrous. January 19, 20, 22, 24, and 25.

What I Want My Words to Do to You. A documentary created by Judith Katz, Madeleine Gavin, and Gary Sunshine. A look at playwright Eve Ensler's writing workshop inside Bedford Hills Correctional Facility for Women. CAST: Nerys Arias, Cynthia Berry, Kathy Boudin, Judith Clark, with Glenn Close, Eve Ensler, Rosie Perez, Marisa Tome.

THE SAME RIVER TWICE. A documentary directed by Robb Moss. From peyote to prozac, a sensitive portrait of five former hippies now approaching middle age.

BROTHER OUTSIDER: THE LIFE OF BAYARD RUSTIN. Directed by Nancy Kates & Bennett Singer. A documentary on the long and unique life of Bayard Rustin, who was the behind the scenes organizer of the 1963 March on Washington (he had tried to organize one in the 1940’s), was active in the movement to free Soviet Jews from the USSR, was jailed during WWII for refusing to serve in a segregated unit, was both used but also hidden behind the scenes by MLK Jr due to his sexual orientation, and was a man who attempted to influence Maclcom X and the Black Panthers to follow the route of Ghandi. (January 17, 18, 19, 23, 24, 2003)

ROBERT CAPA: IN LOVE AND WAR. A documentary directed by Anne Makepeace. A documentary about the life of famed war photographer Robert Capa. January 17 (2:30), January 18 (9 AM), and January 19, 22, 24, 2003

BORN RICH. A documentary directed by Jamie Johnson. A documentary on the "least-likely-to-agree-to-be-interviewed minorities on the planet:" the kids of the insanely rich. Directed by one of their own, Johnson & Johnson heir, Jamie Johnson. CAST: Ivanka Trump, Georgina Bloomberg, SI Newhouse. January 19 (5:30 PM), January 20 (8:30 AM), January 21, and 22, 2003

THE BOYS OF 2nd ST PARK. A Documentary by Dan Klores and Ron Berger. The filmmakers return to a playground in Brighton Beach Brooklyn, and find out what happened to the kids who played together. The effect of the Vietnam War, winning the lottery, Down’s syndrome, an illegitimate birth, and other recollections in the nostalgic film. Jan 21, 22, 23, 24, 2003

MASKED AND ANONYMOUS. directed by Larry Charles. Jack Fate (Bob Dylan), a cult musician who never hit it big, gets sprung from prison by Uncle Sweetheart (John Goodman), a promoter who wants Jack to play a benefit concert -- who stands to benefit is unclear (actually for Uncle Sweetheart’s pockets). A political satire. CAST: Bob Dylan, Luke Wilson, John Goodman, Jessica Lange, Jeff Bridges, Penelope Cruz, Val Kilmer, Giovanni Ribisi, Ed Harris, Angela Bassett, Mickey Rourke (January 22, 23, and 24, 2003)

PEOPLE I KNOW. directed by Daniel Algrant. A New York publicist, Eli Wurman, whose career has seen better days, finds himself being entangled in a mystery involving politics and celebrity. CAST: Al Pacino, Téa Leoni, Kim Basinger, Ryan O'Neal

COMANDANTE. directed by Oliver Stone. Documenatry on the meeting of Oliver Stone and Fidel Castro. January 18 (3 PM) and January 19 (11:30 AM)


DEATH OF KLINGHOFFER. directed by Penny Woolcock. An adaptation from the John Adams opera on the true life incident that took place in the mid 80s. CAST: Christopher Maltman, Dean Robinson, Vivian Tierney, Tom Randle, Kamel Boutros, Sanford Sylvan, Leigh Melrose, January 23, 24, 25, and 26, 2003

THE HEBREW HAMMER. Directed by Jon Kesselman (jonathan baruch kesselman). Wouldn’t it be great if a super hero could save a Jewish kid from taunts by non-Jewish classmates and punks? The Hebrew Hammer can kick ass for Jewish kids everywhere. He is a Semitic Superfly. When Damien, Santa’s evil son, tries to corrupt Christmas, and push xmas on Hasidic kids using “It’s A Wonderful Life” videos, THE HEBREW HAMMER must swoop in with the help of Mohammed (Kwanza front) and Esther (Justice League). In the words of Sundance… it is a Jew-x-ploitation film. CAST: Adam Goldberg, Andy Dick, Mario Van Peebles, Peter Coyote, Judy Greer, January 23 (midnight), January 24 (8:30 PM), January 25 (8:30 PM), January 26 (6 PM in Salt Lake City)

FORD TRANSIT. Directed by Hany Abu-Assad. While Palestinian passengers banter about roadblocks, George Bush, suicide bombers, and the intractable Arab-Israeli standoff, their intrepid freelance driver Rajai maneuvers his Ford minivan--formerly an Israeli police car--along the virtually impassable thoroughfares between East Jerusalem and Ramallah, his movement severely impaired by checkpoints and curfews.  Driving the wrong way down a street, barreling off-road, and flaunting a marked contempt for the policies that have so increased regional anxieties, Rajai embodies the spirit it takes to survive under siege in a film that melds music, humor, and anger into a high-spirited critique of a crisis with no foreseeable end. Monday, January 20, 8:30 AM. Holiday Theater.

STEVIE. By Steve James. The filmmaker returns to find the boy to whom he was a “big brother” many years ago. Stevie had moved among foster homes after being abandoned by his mother, and ran into trouble with the families and the law.

72 VIRGINS (Israel), directed by Uri Bar-On (short film)

CLIMBING MISS SOPHIE (Israel), directed by Liat Dahan (a short film about an Italian elderly woman and the Hispanic boy for whom she cares)

THE REAL OLD TESTAMENT - (USA, 88 min., Narrative, 2002) WORLD PREMIERE Reality TV meets The Book of Genesis as we find out what happens when Biblical patriarchs stop being hallowed religious figures and start getting real! Directed by Curtis and Paul Hannum. SLAMDANCE FILM FESTIVAL 2003.

VARIOUS POSITIONS - (Canada, 90 min., Narrative, 2002) WORLD PREMIERE A law student from an Orthodox Jewish family falls in love with a non-Jewish girl, while his father gets into a scandal involving the local Jewish Cemetery. Directed by Ori Kowarsky. SLAMDANCE FILM FESTIVAL 2003


SCHMELVIS: Searching for the King's Jewish Roots
The film follows a Jewish Elvis impersonator, a skeptical Rabbi and an eclectic group of filmmakers on a mission to unravel the story of Elvis Presley's Jewish roots - a journey that takes them all the way from Graceland to the Holy Land. NODANCE Film Festival. January 21st (Tuesday) at 11 AM





The Schmoozedance 2002 Film Festival page, Click here for the archives

SOME LINKS

Sundance Film Festival

Slamdance Film Fest

NoDance Film Fest

Indiewire - The Source for Sundance News

SchmoozeDance

Return to Jewishfilm.com
Return to MyJewishBooks.com

The Schmoodance 2002 Film Festival page, Click here for the archives



See our Press Clips page for more information on what went on Park City.


SOME JEWISH FILMS BY SUBJECT

Topic: Jewish Adolescence
Topic: Jewish Aging
Topic: Jewish American History
Topic: Anti Semitism
Topic: Australian Jewry
Topic: Austrian Jewry
Topic: Bar Bat Bnai Mitzvah(ot)
Topic: British Jewry
Topic: Canadian Jewry
Topic: Comedy
Topic: Cuban Jewry
Topic: Documentaries
Topic: Drama
Topic: East European Jewry
Topic: Ethiopian Jewry
Topic: French Jewry
Topic: Generation X Jewry
Topic: Holocaust Documentaries
Topic: Holocaust Dramas
Topic: Holocaust General
Topic: Illness and Healing
Topic: Immigration
Topic: Indian Jewry
Topic: Israeli Documentaries
Topic: Israeli Drama
Topic: Other Israeli Films
Topic: Israeli Palestinian Relations
Topic: Italian Jewry
Topic: African American - Jewish Relations
Topic: Klezmer
Topic: Gay Lesbian Bi Queer Jewish Films
Topic: Mexican Jewry
Topic: Mizrahi Jewry
Topic: NYC Jewry
Topic: Orthodox Secular Relations
Topic: Overcoming Disabilities
Topic: Parent Child Relations
Topic: Prison
Topic: Romance
Topic: Russian Jewry
Topic: Scandanavian Jewry
Topic: Sephardic Jewry
Topic: Silent Films
Topic: South American Jewry
Topic: Television
Topic: Jewish Weddings
Topic: Yemenite Jewry
Topic: Yiddish Films
Dear Readers...
Jewishfilm.com is sponsoring SCHMOOZEdance
In Park City on January 17, 2003


Films @ SchmoozeDance (unofficial list)

Friday (01/17/2003) 7:30 PM: Oneg Shabbat
Worship services followed by a Kiddush and
Schmoozedance reception. All are invited.
Location: Temple Har Shalom, 1922 Prospector Ave,
Park City, UT

SchmoozeDance
Films: unofficial
See below for explanations
The Nose Job Jew (USA),
Kosher (USA),
Wontons and Hamentaschen (USA),
Schmatte Mazel (Australia),
The Collector of Bedford Street (USA),
The Joel Files (Germany),
A System for Writing Thank You Notes (USA),
A Home On The Range: The Jewish Chicken Ranchers Of Petaluma (USA
(films subject to change without notice)

[a home on the range chicken farmers] [Kosher by aimee barth]









[the collector of Bedford street] [a home on the range 2]













[eicha] [billy joel the joel files]











[nose job jew] [Jacobs Gift]












FILMS OF Jewish Interest
at Sundance/Slamdance 2003

THE HEBREW HAMMER. Directed by Jon Kesselman. Wouldn’t it be great if a super hero could save a Jewish kid from taunts by non-Jewish classmates and punks? The Hebrew Hammer can kick ass for Jewish kids everywhere. He is a Semitic Superfly. When Damien, Santa’s evil son, tries to corrupt Christmas, and push xmas on Hasidic kids using “It’s A Wonderful Life” videos, THE HEBREW HAMMER must swoop in with the help of Mohammed (Kwanza front) and Esther (Justice League). In the words of Sundance… it is a Jew-x-ploitation film. CAST: Adam Goldberg, Andy Dick, Mario Van Peebles, Peter Coyote, Judy Greer, January 23 (midnight), January 24 (8:30 PM), January 25 (8:30 PM), January 26 (6 PM in Salt Lake City)

[Hebrew Hammer] [Bornrich]










AMERICAN SPLENDOR: Directed by Shari Springer & Robert Pulcini. An original mix of fiction and reality illuminates the life of comic book hero everyman Harvey Pekar. CAST: Paul Giamatti, Hope Davis, Judah Friedlander

CAPTURING THE FRIEDMANS. A documentary directed by Andrew Jarecki (the guy who started 777 FILM and Moviefone. A FAMILY IS CAPTURED on film. Capturing the Friedmans explores the nature of family relations through the prism of the strange and tragic true story of an American family indicted for sex crimes against children, in Great Neck NY, after the father and son are accused of shocking crimes. The media eats this story up, but a lot of the best footage was shot by the family themselves. What is the truth? Whose perspective do you believe? Does the legal system really find the truth? January 17 (5:30), January 18 (midnight), January 20, 22, and 24, 2003

[capturing] [klinghoffer]











THE WEATHER UNDERGROUND. A documentary directed by Sam Green & Bill Siegel. The remarkable story of The Weather Underground, radical activists of the 1960s, and of radical politics at its best and most disastrous. January 19, 20, 22, 24, and 25.

BROTHER OUTSIDER: THE LIFE OF BAYARD RUSTIN. Directed by Nancy Kates & Bennett Singer. A documentary on the long and unique life of Bayard Rustin, who was the behind the scenes organizer of the 1963 March on Washington (he had tried to organize one in the 1940’s), was active in the movement to free Soviet Jews from the USSR, was jailed during WWII for refusing to serve in a segregated unit, was both used but also hidden behind the scenes by MLK Jr due to his sexual orientation, and was a man who attempted to influence Malcolm X and the Black Panthers to follow the route of Ghandi. (January 17, 18, 19, 23, 24, 2003)

ROBERT CAPA: IN LOVE AND WAR. A documentary directed by Anne Makepeace. A documentary about the life of famed war photographer Robert Capa. January 17 (2:30), January 18 (9 AM), and January 19, 22, 24, 2003

[Boys of 2nd] [thenazi]











THE NAZI. A short by Rod Lurie. A woman (Maura Tierney) visits a prison in Israel to meet a Nazi war criminal (James Cromwell) who worked in the concentration camp where her grandmother died. Rod Lurie’s writing and directing credits include Dreamworks’ THE LAST CASTLE, starring Robert Redford and THE CONTENDER, starring Jeff bridges and Joan Allen who both garnered Oscar nominations for their roles. His short film, FOUR SECOND DELAY, won Best Short Prize at several festivals. Lurie began his career as an entertainment journalist and critic

BORN RICH. A documentary directed by Jamie Johnson. A documentary on the "least-likely-to-agree-to-be-interviewed minorities on the planet:" the kids of the insanely rich. Directed by one of their own, Johnson & Johnson heir, Jamie Johnson. CAST INCLUDES: Ivanka Trump, Georgina Bloomberg, SI Newhouse IV. January 19 (5:30 PM), January 20 (8:30 AM), January 21, and 22, 2003

THE BOYS OF 2nd ST PARK. A Documentary by Dan Klores and Ron Berger. The filmmakers return to a playground in Brighton Beach Brooklyn, and find out what happened to the kids who played together. The effect of the Vietnam War, winning the lottery, Down’s syndrome, an illegitimate birth, and other recollections in the nostalgic film. Jan 21, 22, 23, 24, 2003

MASKED AND ANONYMOUS. directed by Larry Charles. Jack Fate (Bob Dylan), a cult musician who never hit it big, gets sprung from prison by Uncle Sweetheart (John Goodman), a promoter who wants Jack to play a benefit concert -- who stands to benefit is unclear (actually for Uncle Sweetheart’s pockets). A political satire. CAST: Bob Dylan, Luke Wilson, John Goodman, Jessica Lange, Jeff Bridges, Penelope Cruz, Val Kilmer, Giovanni Ribisi, Ed Harris, Angela Bassett, Mickey Rourke (January 22, 23, and 24, 2003)

DIE MOMMIE DIE. Directed by Mark Rucker, a hilarious story about the wife to a Hollywood producer, Sol Sussman, and the lengths she will go to have a singing career and fight off her hateful daughter and gay son.

PEOPLE I KNOW. directed by Daniel Algrant. A New York publicist, Eli Wurman, whose career has seen better days, finds himself being entangled in a mystery involving politics and celebrity. CAST: Al Pacino, Téa Leoni, Kim Basinger, Ryan O'Neal

THE EVENT. Directed by Thom Fitzgerald. Canada 2002. 105 min 35 mm. Starring Brent Carver, Olympia Dukakis, and Parker Posey. Matt has AIDS and wants to die. His cocktail of AIDS drugs no longer works. But choosing to die is illegal. Nick, a district attorney, is trying to prosecute those who throw parties and then commit suicide in Manhattan’s Chelsea and West Village neighborhoods. Brent plays the dying Jewish man, and Olympia is the caring, understanding grandmother to the family. Issues raised include, what is the responsibility of those left behind after a suicide; what good are laws that do not serve the people; and can people love a person enough to help him die. Print from Mark Urman. THINKfilm 451 Greenwich St 7th fl. NY NY 10013. 646-214-7908.

FORD TRANSIT. Directed by Hany Abu-Assad of Ramallah, Palestinian Authority area. 2002. 80 minutes in Super 16 mm and 35 mm. Monday, January 20, 8:30 AM. Sundance World Documentary section. Abu Assad, who you may know through Nazareth 2000 and Rana’s Wedding, has filmed this new documentary over a period of 4 weeks. Ford Transit passenger vans are used heavily on the West Bank to ferry Palestinians between towns and Jerusalem (el Quds). These vans were formerly used by the Israeli police, and then were given to Palestinian collaborators, who either leased them as taxis, used them for businesses, or sold them for profits. The director found this colorful, outspoken, and risk-taking cab driver while shooting Rana’s Wedding. While Palestinian passengers banter about Israeli army roadblocks, George Bush, corruption, Arafat, suicide bombers, curfews, and Israel, Rajai, their intrepid driver, maneuvers his Ford mini passenger van along the streets of the West Bank and Israel, between checkpoints and roadblocks, many times using backroads, ploys, and other ways to circumvent the Israel army. Barreling down streets, driving the wrong way down a road, he flaunts his attitude, gets slapped by a soldier, and seethes with contempt. The director [arranges for him] to pick up a Palestinian in a wheelchair to show the difficulty of movement with roadblocks, and arranges for a pretty woman to get on the van to see its affect on the male passengers. The director also interview Palestinian and other notables in the van as Rajai drives the West bank, notably Citizen Bishara, Hanan Ashrawi, and filmmaker BZ Goldberg (watch for a full hour of that interview on the DVD version). The director deftly makes use of western music (Fistful of Dollars), rap (the Palestinians as the Niggers of the Middle East), and Arabic ballads to convey deeper messages to the audience. In mid film, Rajai asks Hany to stop filming, as he picks up a package for delivery to Israel. Hany, who also takes risks, does not stop filming.. and we discover that the Ford Transit is also used for…..

DEATH OF KLINGHOFFER. directed by Penny Woolcock. An adaptation from the John Adams opera on the true life incident that took place in the mid 80s. CAST: Christopher Maltman, Dean Robinson, Vivian Tierney, Tom Randle, Kamel Boutros, Sanford Sylvan, Leigh Melrose, January 23, 24, 25, and 26, 2003

STEVIE. By Steve James. The filmmaker returns to find the boy to whom he wsa a “big brother” many years ago. Stevie had moved among foster homes after being abandoned by his mother, and ran into trouble with the families and the law.

72 VIRGINS (Israel), directed by Uri Bar-On (short film, 4 minutes) Can you solve the Middle East problem in four minutes?

CLIMBING MISS SOPHIE, directed by Liat Dahan (a short film about an Italina woman in a tenement and the young boy for whom she cares)

THE REAL OLD TESTAMENT - (USA, 88 min., Narrative, 2002) WORLD PREMIERE Reality TV meets The Book of Genesis as we find out what happens when Biblical patriarchs stop being hallowed religious figures and start getting real! Directed by Curtis and Paul Hannum. SLAMDANCE 2003.

VARIOUS POSITIONS - (Canada, 90 min., Narrative, 2002) WORLD PREMIERE A law student from an Orthodox Jewish family falls in love with a non-Jewish girl, while his father gets into a scandal involving the local Jewish Cemetery. Directed by Ori Kowarsky. SLAMDANCE 2003

WHAT I WANT MY WORDS TO DO TO YOU. A documentary created by Judith Katz, Madeleine Gavin, and Gary Sunshine. A look at playwright Eve Ensler's writing workshop inside Bedford Hills Correctional Facility for Women. CAST: Nerys Arias, Cynthia Berry, Kathy Boudin, Judith Clark, with Glenn Close, Eve Ensler, Rosie Perez, Marisa Tome.

THE SAME RIVER TWICE. A documentary directed by Robb Moss. From peyote to prozac, a sensitive portrait of five former hippies now approaching middle age.

A Sundance Diary:
Thursday. Jan 16, 2003. 4:30 A.M. - The last time I attended Sundance, I nearly puked on my way to JFK airport at 4:30 AM. The cab driver was in bad need of a wheel bearing job, and the shakiness of the ride was unbearable. This year was a little better, although I had my doubts that the cab driver knew his way from the Upper West Side of Manhattan to the Triborough Bridge and JFK. But we made it in time. Check in was smooth, and the videos I carried made it through the security screens. The 7 AM non stop Delta flight to Salt Lake City was uneventful, and the only demi-celeb I noticed was George Whipple of NY-1 News. I would not have even recognized him had I not been cramped and sitting next to a NY-1 cameraman [note to file, next time get the window seat, what sort of person closes the shade while flying over the Rockies on a clear morning?]. The van ride from SLC to Park City was nondescript. Checking in to the Prospector Inn, I found myself in a room with two huge beds and a kitchenette.. too much room for a single person. Without tickets to the Sundance opening in SLC, I passed the time at the gym, acclimated myself to the 7000 feet of elevation, dropped by Temple Har Shalom to introduce myself, and toured Park City’s Main Street. Waiting in line for a pay phone, I met an Israeli based film producer; a Palestinian film director from Ramallah; and Mr. Schory, the head of Israel’s Film Fund. I invited them to SchmoozeDance 2003. The next day, I ran into the Palestinian director again and walked him back to the hotel; and I bumped into Schory at the “House of Docs” on Main Street.

Friday. Jan 17, 2003. 7:00 A.M. - The sun is rising over Park City; the air is crisp and cold, and a near full moon is still visible in the Western sky. I dress and walk in the cold to the Eccles Theater at the High School for the 9:15 AM showing of LEVITY, the festival’s opener. I am in line over an hour prior to the film’s starting time, and as number 20 in line, I score a Wait Line ticket. Directed by Ed Solomon, the film stars Morgan Freeman, Billy Bob Thornton, and Holly Hunter. Thornton sports a long mane of gray shoulder length hair, a style that I think would be banned by a maximum security prison. Think of the film as a cross between Touched By An Angel and The Man Who Wasn’t There. The theme seemed to focus on how much good must one do to make right a prior bad act, or is it all just moot and folly. I enjoyed the slow moving film, the acting was fine, the professional cast and the unschooled cast of teens performed well. I was most interested however in the director Ed Solomon. Ed related two interesting stories after the film’s screening. He developed the idea for the film after working as a tutor in a prison, many years ago. A teenage murderer he briefly tutored kept a picture of his victim, and fingered it daily as if it were a set of prayer beads. Each day he gazed at the picture of his dead victim, an image that would travel with him from a juvenile facility to an adult level incarceration center. This image appears in the film and sets the tone for the story of psychic redemption. A second story from Mr. Solomon was why Pat Boone saved the film as a Guardian Angel. It turns out that Billy Bob needed to fly with his wife to Namibia from Montreal on March 1. Thornton, who was suffering from bronchitis during Sundance, was actually needed in Montreal for 10 more days to complete filming. Thornton told his director that he would stick around in Montreal the extra days if the director could find someone interesting to fly to Namibia with him in lieu of his wife, someone like Pat Boone. Ed Solomon placed a call to Pat Boone in Las Vegas. Pat Boone accepted the challenge, and thus saved the film. Morgan Freeman and Holly Hunter appeared on stage at the end of the film.

[Ed Solomon director of Levity] [Billy Bob Thornton in Levity]











I left the Eccles, and hurried over to the Holiday Cinemas, for the premier of
TO LIVE IS BETTER THAN TO DIE,
a heart obliterating documentary about a family living with AIDS in China. The director, Weijun Chen, 33, spent a year with a farming family in central China’s Heinan province. Poor, they, like so many others, sold their blood, as encouraged by the government, and contracted the HIV. Farmers received $5 for their donations. Blood was then pooled and transfused back into donors, spreading HIV to everyone. Some farmers, encouraged by the government, donated their plasma three times a week, especially when tuition bills for their children came due. David Ho told me that in some grammar schools in Henan, over 50% of the students are missing BOTH their parents to AIDS. In this film, the mother has full blown AIDS, the father is HIV+, and two of the three children are infected. The oldest daughter is free of the disease. Death is inevitable, but we watch them cope and survive. 65% of Henanese citizens who sold their blood are infected with the disease. No film has ever been made of an infected Chinese family,
[To Live is better than to die]











and only a handful of Western reporters are even allowed in this rural area of China. The film is stark, wrenching, and clinical. We watch the mother die, the family mourn, the oldest daughter succeed in school, and her realize that the death of her father and siblings is coming. The filmmaker, Weijun Chen, had to smuggle his camera equipment into the village by dressing as a farmer and stowing it in fertilizer bags. The village is either Shang Cai or Wen Lou (I am not sure) The director was arrested during filming, but luckily had the digital videos smuggled out by a friend in hotel soap boxes. Fang Li (Frank) Wing edited the film marvelously, so that near the film’s end, playing in the harvested corn, and greeting the lunar new year in song, we see the children live and thrive in the face of future doom.

Afterwards, I popped into the local cable station for Park City and talked up SchmoozeDance with the half Jewish morning show’s host. Later, I arrived at Sundance HQ, the Marriott Hotel, picked up my credentials, and returned to my hotel to prepare for SchmoozeDance.

I tuned my radio into the local Utah NPR station. Earlier in the week, I had been interviewed for a story they were preparing on SchmoozeDance. I was gleeful that SchmoozeDance was also mentioned in Indiewire.com; Filmthreat.com; The Salt Lake City Tribune, and the Park City Record.

As the sun set, the nearly full, Tu B’shvat moon appeared, and I made my way to Temple Har Shalom for the Oneg Shabbat. Over 75 showed up for services and the kiddush, chairs had to be brought in from the hall. At about 8:15, the 75 reassembled, took their seats, and we commenced SchmoozeDance 2003. THE JOEL FILES sparked the most discussion. After viewing THE JOEL FILES, one won’t be surprised that the singer has issues with chemical dependence. Among our guests who introduced themselves to me were Park City residents, tourists, skiers, two young Jewish men from Chile who had read about SchmoozeDance, a Russian émigré who had also read about the fest, a rabbinical student from Los Angeles, a rabbi from Brooklyn, a film scriptwriter, and a filmmaker. I was pleased at the standing room only crowd, and thank Temple Har Shalom for their generous hospitality.

[Toliveisbetterthantodie] [sundance slopes]











Saturday. Jan 18, 2003. 7:00 A.M. I awoke and put on my Sundance uniform… black clothes. Actually, I wore jeans and a dark turtleneck. I arrived at the Yarrow before 8 AM, and waited for a ticket to the Shorts Program IV, which started at 9 AM. I luckily purchased an extra ticket from a patron, and settled in for the five shorts. AUTOBANK was a 3 minute forgettable romp. CLIMBING MISS SOPHIE by Liat Dahan was the director’s Senior film at NYU’s Tisch School. A period piece, filmed in an abandoned tenement, it had the feel of a 1970’s Poppi film. It told the story of a young Hispanic runaway, and the aging Italian woman who took him in. As Liat said, “Family is what you make it.” In FIVE DEEP BREATHS, director Seith Mann, uses some of the best editing techniques (shadows against a brick wall) and a great ensemble cast, to tell the story of two African American college roommates, their fraternity brothers, their girlfriends, and their decisions about loyalty to each other, loyalty to one’s personal ideals, justice, retribution, and friendship.
SWALLOW by director Frank E. Flowers was the highlight of the program. The 23 minute film told the story of a high school senior who is directed to a very unusual scholarship program by his guidance counselor. The star, Joe Reegan, earns tuition as a cocaine mule. The story is based on an event that occurred at J Gray High School in 1998. Filmed in Florida and the Cayman Islands, the film is humorous, frightening, mysterious and dark, and most important, it is well written. I wouldn’t be surprised if it becomes a high school PSA. Flowers, a USC grad, is already represented by Ramses Ishak at William Morris in Beverly Hills, so I wouldn’t worry about his future. GRAVEL by Steven Bognar was set in rural Ohio. A single mother and her teenage daughter embark on trip, along with a male friend of the daughter, to see an ex-con the mother once counseled. She is also contemplating a romantic involvement with him. As the trio drive into the unknown, mother and daughter remember the recent death of the grandmother, and test the bounds of their current relationship.
[a cold line for tickets] [swallow]












11:30 AM - At the end of the Shorts Program, I saw THE UNITED STATES OF LELAND, directed by Matthew Ryan Hoge (Paramount Classics), and starring Don Cheadle, Ryan Gosling, Chris Klein, and with a cameo by Kevin Spacey (a producer). I sat next to two lively personalities from WPLJ-ABC Radio’s Morning Show. In THE UNITED STATES OF LELAND, a teenager kills a retarded boy, goes to a juvenile facility to await trial, and he explains his action, saying he did it because of “The Sadness.” Cheadle plays Pearl Madison, a frustrated novelist and prison school teacher, who sees in the young, intelligent murderer the seed for a book. At the same time, Spacey plays the young murderer’s estranged father, who also sees in his son the root for a new book. Both Cheadle and Gosling delivered fine performances; and I saw my second film about a teen murderer. The story however was flawed, at first I thought Leland was retarded himself. Gosling plays his role earnestly, but the story doesn’t deliver a reason why an intelligent, thoughtful teen would kill a child, but not kill all sad people. His united states of being lacked unity. I do not think that the time in which we live is as morally ambiguous as the director would have us believe, but the film does present several common examples of moral flaws, abuse, parental neglect, media hype, sexual predation and cheating. As Leland tells Pearl, why do people say the “are only human” when the do something wrong, and not when they do something right.

[united states of leland] [capturing the friedmans]












2:00 PM - Snagging a ticket to CAPTURING THE FREIDMANS, I hustled over to The Albertson’s 24 hour supermarket, grabbed a roll and orange juice, and made it back to the line for the award winning documentary by entrepreneur, and former TigerTone, Andrew Jarecki. Jarecki, having sold MovieFone to AOL Time Warner for over $300 Million, set out to make a film about party clowns in New York City. Meeting Manhattan’s top party clown, David Friedman, Jarecki learned that Friedman had a peculiar family history. Not only did his family deteriorate, his father and brother get indicted for dozens of counts of sexual abuse, but the family audio taped and video taped the events. While most families are content to film birthdays and family vacations, the Friedman’s captured their fights and arguments on tape. Just as the Nassau County police battered down the family’s door on one Thanksgiving, CAPTURING THE FRIEDMANS batters down the door of the Great Neck, Long Island family’s most private, unattractive, inner relationships. Not since the PBS series about the Louds, in An American Family, have the viewer been a witness to such a destruction of a family. The father of the middle class Jewish family was a beloved high school teacher, with an interest in reading child pornography. When a postal inspector found the foreign pornography magazines, close to a basement computer camp for neighborhood children, the Nassau County NY police were contacted. This set in motion extremely aggressive police interviews of the camp’s students, student who kept re-enrolling in the classes. Indictments for sexual abuse against two of the family’s members followed, and in the hysteria of California’s McMartin Preschool case, prison sentences were meted out. But Jarecki’s deft editing leaves the audience wondering what actually happened. The family, the media, the police, the “justice” system, and lawyers are all captured in this film, but the “truth”, the truth remains more elusive.


4:00 PM - Taking the shuttle from the Yarrow to Main Street, I get a glimpse of film critic Richard Roeper. On his cell phone, he looks in my direction and spits. I guess I can say he spit at me, but more accurately, he spit in my direction. Shuttle rides in Park City have the feel of parties. You never know who will be there. Some drivers play music loud, some passengers dance in the aisles, and one driver flickered the interior lights on and off and yelled out, “Light Show.” Maybe I am too old, but all I thought was, “insurance liability nightmare.” People are highly personable, I ran into several writers and short film directors on shuttle rides, and most everyone is talkative. Yet I am a ship passing in the night, and it is doubtful any of us will see each other again.

[street] [sundance 04]











How do you describe Sundance? In the midst of deals and dealmakers, celebrities and wanabees, and intelligent supportive audiences, there are flocks of actors, former queen bees, and publicists, the adult versions of teens who were active in drama clubs, and adults who suffer from ADD, or Attention Deficit Disorder. They just can’t get enough attention. One realizes that not only are most actors and actresses relatively short, but they truly feed insatiably off direct attention.

On Main Street, I watched as Kevin Spacey was interview on the balcony of a restaurant overlooking Main Street and the LDS Family History Center. I also glimpsed Redford as a gaggle of reporters followed him down towards Sundance House and the Kimball Art Center. In the middle of Main Street, Chrysler has opened a studio for their Million Dollar Movie. It is a disgusting display of taking advantage of a film festival, even though Volkswagon is the official sponsor of Sundance. On the one hand, I am left with a sour taste for Chrysler, but on the other hand, I would like to have been the Marketing Manager who recommended this guerilla-like promotional idea. In the end, Chrysler’s plan backfired in my opinion. The goon-like doormen at Chrysler Main Street party center rejected so many people, that any goodwill towards the brand was diminished. Volkswagon on the other hand generated a lot of goodwill by handing out hats and lip balm and taking digital pictures of anyone and everyone in the VW Bug convertible.

7:45 PM - I get a ticket to PARTY MONSTER, Randy Barbato’s and Fenton Bailey’s screen adaptation of James St. James’ “Disco Bloodbath,” the story of Manhattan’s 1980’s club scene, club kids and … once again.. teen murder. Macauley Culkin and Seth Green star as Michael Alig and James St. James, respectively. Also has Wilson Cruz, Chloe Sevigny, Natasha Lyonne, and Wilmer Valderrama. The film is stylish and imaginative; it’s self referential style perfectly captures the time period and the style of the overdosing protagonists. Will it make any $$ howver? Only in big cities.

[seth green and macauley culkin] [director and star of the event]











Sunday. Jan 19, 2003. 8:00 A.M. - Today, I get a late start. I read The Times and Salt Lake City Sunday paper, and take a walk to the local 7-Eleven. There I run into the director and editor of TO LIVE IS BETTER THAN TO DIE, and chat with them for 15 minutes. We trade email addresses. Back at the hotel, I hear a man speaking in the cadence and tone of Seth Green’s portrayal of James St James in PARTY MONSTER. I look up, and it is the real James St James, standing with the film’s director, Fenton Bailey, wearing pink and holding a small lunchbox. Suddenly I have the expectation that Boy George might walk through the Marriott’s doors. I later realize that I am standing next to a very nice but dimunitive Seth Green, and an equally short Macauley Culkin.

Sunday. Jan 19, 2003. 2:00 P.M. - I got a ticket to THE COOLER, one of three films at Sundance with the loudest buzz. Directed by Wayne Kramer, the film stars William H. Macy, Maria Bello, and Alec Baldwin. Macy plays Bernie Lootz, a sad sack with perpetual bad luck. He is paying off his debt to the casino by working as their cooler. His character’s luck is so bad, that he can COOL a winner’s luck from good to bad by just walking past him or her. Baldwin plays Shelly Kaplow, an old world, vicious casino boss at Las Vegas’ aging Shangri-La Casino (filmed in Reno). Shelly wants to keep the Shangri-La format in the face of Vegas’ new Disney-like formats. Enter two Jewish, Harvard trained MBA’s (character names of Sokolov and Goldfarb), who want to run the Shangri-La as if Steve Wynn were the CEO. Shelly desperately needs his indentured servant, Bernie, to keep his casino profitable, but when Bernie falls for a cocktail waitress, who brings him the giddiness of Lady Luck, all bets on the casino’s future are off. A mix of CASINO and GOODFELLOWS, with romance and very dark comedy thrown in, this was the only film that I saw that would acquire for profitable distribution. The first few minutes of aerial photographic footage make Las Vegas a glittering semi precious gem. In the Sundance version of the film, prior to any MPAA ratings, Macy is seen in near full frontal nudity; his genitals are partially covered only by his co-star’s hand. Macy quipped that Bello has very large hands and could cup a basketball. (I don’t think so)

[the cooler] [die mommie die]












Sunday. Jan 19, 2003. 5:00 P.M. - I have lost track of time. I shuttle it to Main Street and browse around The Sundance House and a local cybercafe. I meet reps from NYCDANCE, a NYC oriented film fest. I also chat with a writer for a Lebanese publication, a potential Tisch student who just got laid off by the Silk Road project, and a shorts director and recent NYU graduate. Skyy vodka sponsors a party in which their drinks’ ice cubes glow with iridescent blue-purple. I walk a mile down Park Avenue to a chinese restaurant for a late afternoon party. There I once again run into the director and editor of a Chinese film, as well as several film directors; Utah’s director for film development; Greg Pak; and the director of New York’s Asian American International Film Festival. Afterwards, I consider seeing THE WEATHER UNDERGROUND (most of whose members were of Jewish heritage), or LAUREL CANYON. I get closed out of both, so I returned to Main Street and people watched. Later that night I pass and exchange greetings with the actor Forrest Whitaker, taking a cigarette break in a darkened vestibule of the Marriott.

[rachman and mirvis founders of slamdance] [assisted living]












Monday. Jan 20, 2003. 7:00 A.M. - Sadly, I will miss NoDance’s screening of SCHMELVIS, and Slamdance’s screening of ASSISTED LIVING. ASSISTED LIVING went on to win their Grand Jury Prize. I make it to the Holiday Village Cinema by 7:30 A.M. for an 8:30 AM screening of FORD TRANSIT, a Palestinian documentary. I easily score a ticket, and sit next to a filmmaker from Los Angeles. When the director, Hany Abu-Assad, enters, my ego is boosted when he comes up to me to thank me for attending the screening. Yippee. Am I a player, or what? Haha. I run into Liat Dahan (Climbing Miss Sophie), Mr. Bar-On (72 Virgins), and Israel’s Philippa Kowarsky, a Producer from Cinephil. In FORD TRANSIT, Palestinian passengers banter about roadblocks, George Bush, suicide bombers, and Israeli policies, while their van driver, Rajai, maneuvers his Ford minivan along the virtually impassable thoroughfares between East Jerusalem and Ramallah. I discuss the film in greater depth, above.

[fordtransit] [bornrich]












Monday. Jan 20, 2003. 11:30 A.M. - I obtain a ticket to DIE MOMMIE DIE, starring Charles Busch. An adaptation of his stage play of the same name, Busch plays a female singer, married into the family of a schmaltzy Hollywood producer, Sol Sussman. Directed by Mark Rucker, the cast includes Natasha Lyonne (as the daughter) and Jason Priestly (as a gigolo). It was hilarious and filled with schmaltzy phrases about blintzes, punims, and sexual innuendos. Waiting in line for this film, I run into a Penn classmate from 20 years ago, Shawn Levy. He is now an author of 3 books, father of 3 kids, and the film critic for an Oregon newspaper. Levy has his fingers on the artbeat pulse. One book was on Jerry Lewis, published years before the successful television drama of Lewis and Martin. Another book is on the swinging sixties, published in time for the Austin Power’s generated interested in that psychedelic period.
In the afternoon, I returned to Main Street, Slamdance, the Digital Center, and Sundance’s House of Docs.

Monday. Jan 20, 2003. 6:30 P.M. - In the evening, I eat a real meal of a chicken BBQ sandwich, change clothes, and wander to the Eccles to score a ticket for BORN RICH and TERMINAL BAR, two Manhattan area documentaries. I catch a glimpse of Roger Ebert and his wife. Sitting near Shawn Levy, a CNN producer, and a writer for Teen People, the screening starts with TERMINAL BAR, a documentary by Brooklyn’s Stefan Nadelman. TERMINAL BAR ended up winning an Award at Sundance. With creative film editing, Nadelman tells the story of his family’s gritty, scary Times Square tavern, and its evolution from hard drinking neighborhood Irish bar, to working class black bar, to black gay bar. Based on the trove of photo taken over decades of the bar’s customers, we watch as the faces of bar regulars grow gaunt from years of disease and abuse. In BORN RICH, Jamie Johnson, an heir to the Johnson & Johnson fortune, entices his father and his fellow heirs to talk about the life goals and the influence of extreme wealth on their childhoods and life choices. Johnson isn’t successful in getting his father to open up, and he isn’t successful in telling a coherent story, but the audience does get an illuminating, at times too honest, glimpse at the thoughts of college aged kids who will inherit great wealth through the luck of their births. Included in the footage are interviews with S.I. Newhouse IV (fencer and student), Ivanka Trump (Penn student), Georgina Bloomberg (equestrian), Cody Franchetti, Josiah Hornblower, and Luke Weil. Weil is the most outrageous and makes for good film viewing, while Hornblower is the most earnest and sympathetic, although he seems to be medicated.

Monday. Jan 20, 2003. 10:00 P.M. - I catch a glimpse of Elvis Mitchell, film critic for the NYT, as a wait in an very cold line for admittance to CAMP. Luckily there are gas heaters every few feet to warm the night air. CAMP is a high energy film that I liken to FAME in a Summer Camp environment. CAMP offered extreme enjoyment and the best musical performance at Sundance. The teenage cast murdered no one, so it gave me hope for teen cinema. Directed by Todd Graff, the script tells the story of teens who seek escape and acceptance at Camp Ovation (Carl Samuelson’s Stagedoor Manor) in Loch Sheldrake, NY, where they can act, act out, perform, and seek romance with kids like themselves. Graff, a Tony nominated stage actor, was both a camper and counselor at a similar arts camp, and enlisted Arthur Laurents and Stephen Sondheim to help in in his decades long film project. At 2 AM, the film let out and I scrambled for the last shuttle back to Prospector Square.

[camp by todd graff] [camp actors]











Tuesday, Jan 21, 2003. 7:00 A.M. - I am down to $8 and $2.50 in change. I make it to the Yarrow and get a ticket to SHORT PROGRAM IV. A ticket is $10, so I am left with 50 cents for the rest of the morning. Films included AQUI IBA EL HIMNO (Here was the anthem), directed by Manhattan’s Sergio Umansky; COME NIGHTFALL, directed by Abigail Severance; STRUGGLE by Ryan Fleck; O BEAUTIFUL by Alan Brown; and THE SUPPORT GROUP by Daniel Milder. John Viener, and Josh Weinstein. In THE SUPPORT GROUP, one man (not a therapist but someday maybe he will be a therapist) runs a support group for men who have failed in coed sports to hilarious effects. In O BEAUTIFUL, director Alan Brown uses a split screen to tell the story an rural, all American, church going, Eagle scout and choir member and the nefarious action he takes against a fellow student.
Afterwards, a caught at 11:30 AM screening of THE STATION AGENT, the story of a dwarf from Hoboken who inherits an abandoned train station in Central NJ. Seeking solitude, who encounters two other adults, and finds that solitude isn’t all it’s cracked up to be. Tom McCarthy directed this film, and named the train depot Newfoundland. Peter Dinklage plays Finbar McBride, a dwarf in fear of bars (where they toss midgets and dwarfs); Patricia Clarkson (who is in 3 other Sundance films) plays a despondent neighbor who drives recklessly; and Bobby Cannavelle is well cast as the area’s lonely hotdog and coffee vendor who incessantly seeks out companionship.

[the support group] [the station agent]












SchmoozeDance mentioned in The Los Angeles Times, January 27, 2003, Monday
SUNDANCE FILM FESTIVAL;
A delicate balancing act in Park City;
A winning film like 'American Splendor' exemplifies the newfinancial realities of independent films.
BYLINE: Kenneth Turan, Times Staff Writer
DATELINE: PARK CITY, Utah
   The Sundance Film Festival's selection for its dramatic grand jury prize, Shari Springer Berman and Robert Pulcini's "American Splendor," reflects the complex new realities of the independent film scene.
   As a warm, playful and visually inventive biopic about permanently disaffected Harvey Pekar, who became an icon of the underground comic world without being able to draw a straight line, "American Splendor" has impeccable counterculture credentials. But the film was financed by and will be initially shown on cable TV's HBO, which, along with Showtime, is emerging as an unlikely corporate home base for independent-style projects…..
   The documentary grand jury prize went to Andrew Jarecki's bizarre "Capturing the Friedmans," a film that also reflects a contemporary American malaise -- our obsession with reality TV. It tells the story of a family intent on recording itself on video long before it became popular, and it kept on doing so even after the father and youngest son were arrested on multiple charges of child molestation.
   The dramatic film gathering the most awards was "The Station Agent," Tom McCarthy's sophisticated, beautifully made story of the unlikely connection among three solitary lives.
   Purchased by Miramax, it took the dramatic audience award as well as the Waldo Salt screenwriting prize, plus one-third of a special jury prize for outstanding performance given to Patricia Clarkson for her roles in that film, "Pieces of April" and "All the Real Girls."
   Veteran drag performer Charles Busch got the same outstanding performance prize for "Die Mommie Die." Accepting for the actor, who was appearing in a play in New York, was producer Dante DiLoreto, who got off perhaps the night's best line when he said, "I don't know what it says about the state of independent film that you have to work in the theater to support your film career."
   Taking the jury prize in short filmmaking was "Terminal Bar," Stefan Nadelman's portrait of a venerable Manhattan drinking establishment. The director thanked his father for his decade of taking still photographs of the bar's clientele.
   "When he left Park City after the screening," Nadelman related, "my father said, 'Not only did you make my day, you made my life.' And my mother started crying."
   Sundance's cross-town rival, Slamdance, still the top alternative festival despite challenges from newcomers X-Dance (for extreme sports films) and SchmoozeDance (for Jewish films), gave out its prizes Friday night. Elliot Greenebaum's "Assisted Living" took the jury prize for best dramatic feature, David Eberhardt and Jack Cahill's "Long Gone" won for best documentary and Karin Hayes and Victoria Bruce's doc "Missing Peace" took the audience award for best feature.
   "Born Rich," directed by Jamie Johnson, the 23-year-old Johnson & Johnson pharmaceuticals heir, offers privileged entree to the thought patterns, such as they are, of the director's peers -- young people of unimaginable wealth who obsess about prenuptial agreements before they've so much as fallen in love.

















[jewishbrigade] [exodus] [quarrel]







[triumph] [leni] [wansee]








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