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What a Wonderful Place (Eize makom nifla)

TITLE: What a Wonderful Place ( Eize makom nifla )
YEAR: 2005
DIR/PROD: Eyal Halfon / Yoav Roeh, Assaf Amir
COUNTRY: Israel
LANGUAGE: Hebrew w/ English Subtitles
TIME: 104 minutes
SOURCE: Norma Productions 18 Levontin St., IL - 65112 Tel Aviv Israel Tel: +972 3 560 9311 Fax: +972 3 560 9443 E-mail: yoavroeh@zahav.net.il
SYNOPSIS: Cast: Evelyn Kaplun, Uri Gavriel, Avi Oria. Near the Arava border crossing, several Ukrainian women pass through the barbed wire separating Israel from Jordan. On the other side of the border a former policeman named Franco picks them up. He now works for a gangster boss who runs an organized prostitution ring in the area. Franco takes an interest in Jana, and she's also being sought out by a dumpy looking farmer named Zeltzer who has found a bag of hers containing photographs of her loved ones. The Thais that work on Zeltzer's farm are being persecuted by Officer Eloni, a tough cop who simply doesn't like them. He's got to look after his disabled father and the only one who can help out is a Philippine gambling junkie named Eddie. Not surprisingly, his gambling debts have gotten him in Dutch with the gangster boss.... These three seemingly unconnected stories unfold in a multiethnic environment. Structured as a mosaic, the drama offers a surprising perspective on social conditions in a region lying near the Dead Sea.
About the director: Eyal Halfon (Netanya, Israel) graduated in history from Tel Aviv University. He has held jobs as a guide, lifeguard and journalist. In 1991 he wrote the script for the war movie Cup Final, and three years later he debuted as a director with the romantic drama The Italians Are Coming. Between 1995 and 2002 he shot eight medium-length documentaries. He received the greatest acclaim, however, for Circus Palestina (1998), a feature that took five Israeli Film Academy Awards, including Best Picture and Best Director. Halfon's latest writer-director creation, InSights (2003), won Best Drama at the festival in Jerusalem.
Seen at The Karlovy Vary International Film Festival, July 2005

In Search of Happiness ( V poiskach šcastja )

TITLE: In Search of Happiness ( V poiskach šcastja )
YEAR: 2005
DIR/PROD: Alexander Gutman / Vjaceslav Telnov/Viacheslav Telnov, Alexander Gutman
COUNTRY: Russia
LANGUAGE: Russian with English Subtitles
TIME: 54 minutes
SOURCE: St. Petersburg Documentary Film Studio Krukov kanal 12, 190 068 St. Petersburg Russia Tel: +7 812 114 5312 Fax: +7 812 114 3304 E-mail: cinedoc@peterstar.ru
TEXT: This documentary comes out of a confrontation between past dreams and present-day realities for Soviet Jews inhabiting a Jewish Republic that Stalin set up in 1934, with the capital at Birobidzhan, Siberia. It brings to life scenes of the first settlers' original enthusiasm and hard work, relating how the community grew into an autonomous social and cultural unit, though it was shaped by traditional ideas as well. The settler's presence is felt even today in the largely depopulated enclave - most of their decendants emigrated to Israel. Old resident and survivor Boris Rak is an erudite and discerning guide to the singular world of one of the first Jewish kolkhozes. His kids live in Israel, yet despite his advanced age, he, his wife and his remaining fellow citizens preserve the well-established rhythm of the local community. Drawing on his own experiences, he comments on the past and present of the country in which he lives, as well as on the pressing problem of anti-Semitism.
About the director: Alexander Gutman (b. 1945) graduated from Leningrad Polytechnic (1968) and Moscow's Film School (VGIK, 1978). Since 1971 he has been a cameraman for Moscow, Rostov, Leningrad, and Finnish television. As a cameraman he has shot over 100 films, and 13 as a director. He has won numerous awards at international (e.g. Tampere, Lisbon, Huesca, Pärnu, Houston, Ann Arbor, Brooklyn) and domestic festivals (Yekaterinburg, Moscow). Today he works with the St Petersburg Studio of Documentary Film. Selected filmography: The Russians Have Gone (Russkiye ushli, 1991), 1244, 1245, 1246 (1994), Up to the Neck or Bodybuilding (Telo bez golovy ili bodibilding, 1996), Three Days and Never More (Tri dnya i bolshe nikogda, 1998; Grand Prix at the Stalker FF in Moscow), Journey Back to Youth (Puteshestviye v yunost, 2003), Frescoes (Freski, 2004; Grand Prix at the Flahertyana FF in Perm), The Sunny Side of the Road (Solnechnaya storona trassy, 2004).
Seen at The Karlovy Vary International Film Festival, July 2005

Live and Become ( Va, vis et deviens )

TITLE: Live and Become ( Va, vis et deviens )
YEAR: 2005
DIR/PROD: Radu Mihaileanu / Marie Masmonteil, Denis Carot, Radu Mihaileanu
COUNTRY: France, Israel, Italy, Belgium
LANGUAGE: English Subtitles
TIME: 146 minutes
SOURCE: Films Distribution 20, rue Saint-Augustin, 75002 Paris France Tel: +33 1 531 033 99 Fax: +33 1 531 033 98 E-mail: info@filmsdistribution.com www: www.filmsdistribution.com
TEXT: Cast: Yael Abecassis, Roschdy Zem, Moshe Agazai, Mosche Abebe, Sirak M. Sabahat. Thanks to his false Jewish identity, a nine-year-old black Ethiopian manages to escape from a refugee camp in the Sudan, where he would have died of starvation. His mother - a Christian - smuggles him into a rescue transport for Ethiopian Jews known as Falash, who are offered asylum in Israel ("Operation Moses" in 1984). Under a different name, Shlomo finds it hard to get used to the new surroundings. He misses his mother and refuses to adapt to the collective with whom he is in constant conflict. However, his adoption into a harmonious family environment pacifies him somewhat, although he continues to suffer complexes in concealing his true origins. Before Shlomo grows up, he experiences difficulties trying to integrate in his quest for his true - human - identity: racist attacks, Judaism and the war in the occupied territories. He studies medicine in France before he is finally able, now a man and himself a father, to return to his roots.
About the director: Radu Mihaileanu (b. 1958, Bucharest) is a French director of Romanian and Jewish descent, the latter determining his artistic creed. He studied direction and film editing at the I.D.H.E.C. in Paris (1983). Before directing his own films, he worked as a screenwriter and assistant director (for Marco Ferreri, Fernando Trueba, Nicole Garcia etc.). He won a Debut Award at Montreal for his feature debut Trahir (1993). His second film The Train of Life (1998) was also hailed by the critics. The film won numerous awards, e.g. the FIPRESCI at Venice, the Donatello award in 1999, a César nomination in 1999 for Best Screenplay and Best Actor. The film was screened in the Horizons section at the KV IFF in 1999. The film Live and Become (2005) was inspired by the authentic story of an Ethiopian who, pretending to be a Jew since his childhood, was deported to Israel where he endured a wretched journey in search of his identity. Winner of the Label Europa Award, Panorama Audience Award and the Prize of the Ecumenical Jury at the Berlinale Film Festival, 2005
Seen at The Karlovy Vary International Film Festival, July 2005

PARADISE NOW

TITLE: PARADISE NOW
YEAR: 2005
DIR/PROD: Hany Abu-Assad / Bero Beyer / Augustus Film
COUNTRY: France, Germany, Netherlands, Palestine Authority
LANGUAGE: Arabic with English Subtitles
TIME: 90 minutes
SOURCE: Augustus Film Bloemgracht 282, 1015 TV Amsterdam Netherlands Tel: +31 20 622 1266 Fax: +31 20 420 2574 E-mail: info@augustusfilm.com OR Celluloid Dreams 2, rue Turgot, 75009 Paris France Tel: +33 1 497 003 70 Fax: +33 1 497 003 71 E-mail: info@celluloid-dreams.com www: www.celluloid-dreams.com
TEXT: Cast: Kais Nashef, Ali Suliman, Lubna Azabal, Amer Hlehel, Hiam Abbass, Ashraf Barhoum. Synopsis: This film by a Palestinian filmmaker working in the Netherland offers at least a partial answer to a burning issue: who are suicide bombers and what are their motives? Friends from childhood, Said and Khaled live in Nábulus and work in a car repair shop. One evening, they are told that they have been selected as martyrs for a suicide bombing in Tel Aviv. The young men accept the task as read. They spend the last night with their families who cannot be allowed to find out the truth. In the morning, they undergo the appropriate rituals at headquarters, then get through the barbed wire fence into Israeli territory. The operation is unexpectedly foiled, however, but they still have time to consider whether or not to go ahead. A girl called Suha plays an important role; she has lived abroad for a long time and affirms that there are other ways to resolve the difficult situation of the Palestinians than by murdering innocent people. The film strives for objectivity and simple realism, thus all the more palpable is the tragic dilemma of a divided land and its people.
About the director: Hany Abu-Assad (b. 1961, Nazareth), Palestinian screenwriter, director and producer, studiede engineering in the Netherlands. There, in 1990, he established Ayloul Film Productions, where he has produced television programmes on the problem of immigration. Abu-Assad made his first short, Paper House, in 1992. After several more documentaries addressing multicultural issues in Europe and the Middle East, he debuted in features with the comedy The Fourteenth Chick (Het 14e kippejte, 1998). Then he enjoyed acclaim for his second feature Ranas Wedding (Al qods fee yom akhar, 2002), in which a 17-year-old Palestinian girl has to decide upon a husband within a few hours. He received further accolades for his drama Paradise Now (2004), honoured with the Blue Angel Award for Best European Film and the Amnesty International Award at the Berlin IFF in 2005. Ford Transit (2002).
Seen at The Karlovy Vary International Film Festival, July 2005 and Toronto in September 2005

Year Zero ( Shnat Efes )

TITLE: Year Zero ( Shnat Efes )
YEAR: 2005
DIR/PROD: Joseph Pitchhadze / Lior Shefer, Joseph Pitchhadze, Dov Steuer
COUNTRY: Israel
LANGUAGE: Hebrew with English Subtitles
TIME: 130 minutes
SOURCE: Cinephil 18 Levontil Str., 65 112 Tel Aviv Israel Tel: +972 3 566 4129 Fax: +972 3 560 1436 E-mail: info@cinephil.co.il www: www.cinephil.co.il
TEXT: Cast: Menashe Noy, Sarah Adler, Moni Moshonov, Keren Mor, Ezra Kafri, Danny Geva, Dan Toren. Synopsis: It seems to happen at some point in everyone's life: you are permitted (or forced) to start over again from square one. That very thing happens to the protagonists of Israeli director Joseph Pitchhadze's latest film. Employing the popular multiple-stories genre, the director offers a portrait of contemporary life as seen in the everyday realities of several characters. The protagonists, connected by various relationships, must come to terms with unexpected, though transformational, reversals. Egoistical real estate agent Reuven is bothered by the fact that his wife suddenly becomes pregnant. A single mother named Anna has hit absolute bottom: Reuben kicks her out of their apartment, and when she cannot find a job she ends up as a prostitute. Then she meets forty-year-old Matti who is somehow mixed up in the underworld. A soundman named Frank becomes close to a co-worker, Reuben's wife, and gets to know his biological father, a onetime member of his parents' punk band.... These and many other people meet (or don't) and their lives unavoidably connect.
About the director: Joseph Pitchhadze (b. 1965, Tbilisi) emigrated with his family to Israel from Georgia in 1972. He graduated in film and television from Tel Aviv University. After the short films Dreaming in Russian (Holem b'rusit, 1990) and Bad Days (Yamim rai'im, 1993), he debuted with the post-modern, black-and-white thriller Under Western Eyes (Leneged finayim ma'araviyot, 1996), screened at Berlin. Another thriller followed, Besame Mucho (2000), this time set in night-time Tel Aviv, then the psychological drama Year Zero (Shnat efes, 2004). Pitchhadze not only directs, but writes and produces his movies as well.
Seen at The Karlovy Vary International Film Festival, July 2005

Beethoven's Hair

TITLE: Beethoven's Hair
YEAR: 2005
DIR/PROD: Larry Weinstein
COUNTRY: Canada / Czech Republic
LANGUAGE: German with English Subtitles
TIME: 90 minutes
SOURCE: rhombus media
TEXT: Beethoven's Hair traces the unlikely journey of a lock of hair cut from Beethoven's corpse and unravels the mystery of his tortured life and death. The film begins in modern times, when a pair of Beethoven enthusiasts purchase the hair at a Sotheby's auction. The story then looks at the lock's previous owners and culminates in the science that reveals Beethoven's "medical secret". Set to a lush score of some of Beethoven's most glorious music, the film explores the world of forensic testing in sharp relief against the romance of 19th-century Vienna and the horrors of 20th-century Nazi Germany . Seen at Hot Docs 2005

Rosehill

TITLE: Rosehill / Rózsadomb
YEAR: 2004
DIR/PROD: Mari Cantu
COUNTRY: Hungary/Germany
LANGUAGE: Hungarian with English Subtitles
TIME: 35mm 96 minutes
SOURCE:
TEXT: Rosehill explores a chapter in Hungary 's stormy history not well-known to Americans. The year is 1956, and Gabor (Peter Andorai), a high-ranking minister in the Communist regime, lives a luxurious life in a large villa and garden, named Rosehill, with his much-younger wife, and their young children, Panka and Miksa. Veteran communist Gabor has long-since rejected his bourgeois Jewish family roots and the kids grow up curious and carefree, mainly under the eyes of an old, devoutly Catholic female servant. A mysterious letter addressed to Papa arrives from a woman in Israel , which the children hide in what they perceive to be the interest of family harmony. The same summer, Hungarians rise against their oppressive government in a revolution cut short by the new hard-line Soviet puppet regime. These two happenings send Gabor into a fury of introspection, which changes the fortune of the family forever. Seen at Washington DC JFF, August 2005
They write: After long years I came across the book entitled "Dead Sea Scrolls" written by my father Horváth Márton. I was not moved by its political content, but rather by its remoteness - as if this theme was looking back at me from the sunken world of Atlantis, from beyond seven dead seas. My parents have been dead for over ten years, and the world they lived in and lived for is also submerged, just like my "socialist" childhood. Authentic and fictitious elements are combined in this story. Ten-year-old Panka and Miksa are living out their idyllic childhood in a closely guarded Rosehill villa with its rambling, wild garden. Their father is a leading politician in the Rákosi government, and it is the summer of 1956. The film's almost only locations are the villa and the garden. The audience views the events from the children's perspective. The parents, who have been 'lifted' out from among simple people - the strict and deeply religious Teréz and Gábor Pálfi, who is about 20 years older than her, coming from a well-to-do Jewish bourgeois family - are very busy. They are building the "new world". It is mostly Róza, the superstitious and secretly God-fearing household employee, who deals with the children, but they practically bring themselves up. They are growing up wild like weeds; their world is the garden, grown wild. Róza's superstitious stories and the mysterious battle fought behind papa's closed padded door for a better future shape a grotesque worldview in the children's imagination.
The film takes place in 1956, but that's only the background. The movie is set in a large villa and its garden on the Rózsadomb, this is where the protagonist family lives. The father is a high-ranking politician of the Stalinist establishment, who becomes disillusioned in 1956 and turns his back on power. We see the events unfold through the eyes of the children, who think that they are the cause of everything because they have stolen a letter from their father. In my film, the emphasis is on showing what power does to men, how they break down in their private lives, how they fall apart, and how the children carry this historic burden on their shoulders. I hope that this lends the story a certain tragicomic quality. We see the events from the point of view of the children and follow their logic, which results in comic situations. The film is about the most grown-up of topics: politics, political power. If we take a look at it from the lowest perspective, the difference between the two already yields something. The 1956 reveolution took place at the height of dictatorship, and also because it is a historic even known worldwide. But the emphasis is on private life, not a shot is fired in the film, even though a tank does appear in front of the house. For me, it's important that there's a big, external, political event taking place, which determines internal relationships as well, and also the way the children see and interpret it.

Fateless (Sorstalanság)

TITLE: Fateless (Sorstalanság)
YEAR: 2005
DIR/PROD: Koltai Lajos
COUNTRY: Hungary
LANGUAGE: Hungarian with English Subtitles
TIME: 140 minutes, 35mm
SOURCE: www.ThinkFilmCompany.com
TEXT: Based on the novel by Imre Kertesz, Nobel Prize recipient. Köves is an ordinary adolescent Jewish boy living an ordinary life in Budapest in 1944. Not long after his father is deported to a forced labour camp, Köves is also arrested and put on a cattle truck of a train on-route for Auschwitz, and then to Buchenwald. Köves does not rebel against his fate, he is not surprised, and does not look for a way out. He makes passing friendships as he finds himself next to adults and children; some are already burnt-out, terrified or compliant, while others are tough characters, who then drift away from him. He merely observes the scenes unravelling before him, until he gets back home after a long series of accidents, lucky and unlucky twists and turns of fate. There is nothing, no matter how absurd, that people cannot survive... Music by Ennio Morricone Stars: Nagy Marcell, Dimény Áron, Harkányi Endre, M. Kecskés András, Gyabronka József, Dóra Béla, Szabó Dániel, Dér Zsolt Source: EuroArts Medien GmbH., Renegade Films Ltd., Magyar Televízió
NYT review: The visual beauty of Lajos Koltai's "Fateless" is unmistakable, and also a bit disconcerting. This is, after all, a movie about the Holocaust, which follows a 14-year-old Jewish boy from Budapest to Buchenwald, where it lingers in mud, misery and death. For films in this genre - which has grown steadily since Steven Spielberg's "Schindler's List" was released in 1993 - the test of verisimilitude is usually the ostentatiously accurate rendering of horror. There is plenty of that in "Fateless," and yet one finds oneself noticing, along with the emaciated bodies and ambient cruelty, the delicacy of the light and the painterly composition of the frames.....
... But Mr. Kertesz's rendering of his childhood experience, on the page and now on screen, is by no means an attempt to aestheticize an unredeemable chapter of history. It represents something stranger and, to those of us with only a secondhand or thirdhand knowledge of that history, more disturbing: a survivor's conviction that there were aspects of the experience itself that can only be described as beautiful.
.... A mordant sense of the ridiculous pierces the gloom of "Fateless," a form of wit that seems to combine Jewish comic traditions with the wry fatalism common in small nations perpetually batted around by their larger imperial neighbors. The hero, Gyorgy Koves (Marcell Nagy), nicknamed Gyuri, thinks of himself as both Jewish and Hungarian, and mocks a friend's attempt to determine an independent essence of Jewishness. Gyuri's father is a factory owner who, as the film begins, is about to be sent away to perform manual labor.
The full force of the German campaign against Jews arrived in Hungary later than in other countries, and Gyuri's neighbors and relatives seem bewildered and unprepared, fussing over irrelevancies and dispensing false reassurance. When Gyuri and some other boys are ordered off a city bus on the way to their work assignments, they take it as both an example of bureaucratic incompetence and something of a lark. The adults who join them are annoyed and indignant; nobody, at first, thinks to be scared.
... In the camp, he finds kindness, in particular from a fellow Hungarian (Aron Dimeny). He also discovers that the ordinary course of life yields moments of pleasure. In his voice-over, he speaks of loving the hour of idleness between work and the nighttime roll call. He and the other inmates eat their vile rations not only with desperation, but with relish as well, when they discover a scrap of meat or a potato. The ability to wring such satisfactions from nearly absolute deprivation is one of the ways the prisoners hold on to their humanity. And Gyuri, whose previous experience of the world is narrower than that of his older comrades, experiences "fatelessness" - the likelihood that his life will end at any moment - as a perverse form of freedom.
... To the modern viewer, watching movies about the Holocaust carries an inevitable element of solipsism: what would I have done? How would I have behaved? This is a way of normalizing and domesticating something that surpasses comprehension. The achievement of "Fateless" is to work in reverse, to show us what it might have been like to endure atrocity as a form of ordinary reality, which is exactly what is hardest to imagine.

A Miracle in Cracow (Csoda Krakkóban)

TITLE: A Miracle in Cracow (Csoda Krakkóban)
YEAR: 2004
DIR/PROD: Diana Groó
COUNTRY: Hungary
LANGUAGE: Hungarian with English Subtitles
TIME: 94 minutes
SOURCE: szemle.film.HU
TEXT: Once upon a time there lived a man called Nikos in one of the homey corners of the underground at Baross square, Budapest. He is found here by Greek probate solicitors and with them by a "miracle". On his deathbed Nikos's uncle, whom he had almost completely forgotten, had named Nikos as the sole heir of a luxury hotel complex sprawling over half the island. Nikos is sought out and put on an airplane bound for Crete. At first Nikos doesn't really comprehend the whole thing; and then when he does but can't believe it. Is it a dream or is it reality? If the hotel is really his, why is he sleeping at the foot of some evergreens, clinging to the rags he had worn as a homeless man? Why is he eating all the leftovers off plates? And why is this strange hotelier still scavenging? If worse comes to worst I will wake up from this, he thinks. What kind of trouble comes along with the inheritance? A Greek interpreter speaking Hungarian with a funny accent, a militant woman director whose feeling heart is clad in heavy armour. And then to add to all this there are the boisterous and cheerful homeless pals from Budapest to ruin what's left of the long-standing good reputation of the hotel. The money hungry aunt and Nikos's ex-wife also turn up, accompanied by a crowd of relatives all after the inheritance from far and wide. Nikos is tending to business, wearing a snow-white suit with an altogether spotless appearance. He backs out of the fight for the inheritance very elegantly, since the real "miracle" is not the inheritance but that he is able to love again, and laugh again with someone, and as tales have it: "They lived happily ever after until..."
Diana Groó has directed a number of short films and documentaries (Trapé, Valahonnan valahová, Kazinczy utca, Vityebszk felett, Chagall álmai, Córesz, Renoir álmai, Bruegel, Henri-Rousseau álmai). Csoda Krakkóban is her first feature film. Music by: Kardos Dániel, Klezmatics, Budapest Klezmer Band. Cast: Bíró Eszter, Maciej Adamczyk, Franciszek Pieczka, Békés Itala, Iván Dániel Ármin, Bartlomiej Swiderski, Stanislawa Celinska, Jerzy Trela. Influenced by Vittorio De Sica's Miracle in Milan. The script is full of personal and family memories. Diane's grandparents were a Jewish merchant family, they lived in Krakow and they had an enormous library. The book was compiled from family legends, anecdotes, personal experiences. Diane writes that, "It wasn't a conscious choice to make a film about a Jewish subject. I focused on the nature of Jewish identity in my documentary Córesz, since the young people in film are talking about that. But Csoda Krakkóban is a tale. The reason why it features a Jewish rabbi, the Kabbala, the Jewish district in Krakow and District 7 in Budapest is that it's in me, this is what I've been interested in in my whole life. I'm not a religious Jew, I was born in a mixed family - my mother was Jewish and I do keep the traditions, but of course we celebrate Christmas as well. My sensitivity towards the subject probably derives from the trauma of the Holocaust. My grandmother had been to Auschwitz but she returned. She was the only one from the family. This makes you think that something was nearly lost. And starts to search for the lost things, while my grandma had never done that, she is astonished to see me and my brother. For me, it's natural. What's more, the story of eastern European Jews - Prague, Vienna, Krakow, Budapest, Máramarossziget - have a very special culture and atmosphere. It would be great to portray this sovereign, authentic, mysterious world, as if it still existed, but only fragments of it remain. This is going to be a real central European film, at least that's what I hope. Four languages are spoken in it: Polish, Hungarian, Yiddish and "tourist" English. This also reinforces the concept that the Jewish heritage transcends borders."
The "Silver Crown" is a magic book, which contains the secret that brings back the dead from the afterworld. The spiritual heritage is the only actual tangible inheritance. If you read and become familiar with the world of the books, no one can ever take away from you. As the grandmother grows older, she is searching for the book more and more desperately. So that Piotr won't be alone. But the book belongs to Rabbi Levi of Krakow. Because according to the legend, in he 16th century there lived a rabbi, who could bring back the dead. The message of my film is that the past provides plenty of power, but at a certain point we must break loose from it, and build the future from the past. Piotr lives among books, he creates a hermetically sealed world for himself. He doesn't dare to admit to himself that he has fallen in love. The miracle happens, but not the way he (and the viewer) expected it to. Our life is built on coincidences, which have meaning, therefore, we must believe that the miracle will happen.

Memories of a Journey... (Ami megmaradt belole...)

TITLE: Memories of a Journey... (Ami megmaradt belole...)
YEAR: 2004
DIR/PROD: Barbara Spitzer
COUNTRY: Hungary
LANGUAGE: with English Subtitles
TIME: 150 minutes, video
SOURCE: szemle.film.HU
TEXT: This film is the story of a journey. A journey in time and space between France and Hungary, between the past and the present. The first railway station evokes mourning over a lost and unforgettable father, leaving behind a feeling of emptiness and the desire to embark on the journey. The itinerary: to tell people what has remained to be seen, memories and feelings, some of which you are aware of, some of which you are not. Having encountered the Jewish Hungarians roots and becoming familiarised with their language during this journey you will come back changed. Encounters with a culture, places, faces, memories and forgetting mould you into a new person. Supported by: Magyar Mozgókép Közalapítvány, Nemzeti Kulturális Örökség Minisztériuma, Duna Televízió

The School of the Empire (A Birodalom iskolája)

TITLE: The School of the Empire (A Birodalom iskolája)
YEAR: 2003
DIR/PROD: Zsigmond Gábor Papp
COUNTRY: Hungary
LANGUAGE: with English Subtitles
TIME: 57 minutes
SOURCE: szemle.film.HU
TEXT: The School of the German Empire was established in 1908 for the children of German, Austrian and Czech diplomats and traders working in Budapest. The co-educational school, with twelve grades, first operated in Kálmán Street and then in Damjanich Street. After World War I, following the collapse of the Monarchy, Hungarian children were also allowed to enroll. Supported by: Magyar Történelmi Film Alapítvány, Nemzeti Kulturális Alapprogram. This is when the children of the Budapest wealthy middle-class of Jews came to the school. Instruction in the School of the Empire was conducted at a very high level, in German, but students also learnt Hungarian, English, French and Latin. Some of the teachers brought with them the democratic spirit that characterised the Weimar Republic, while some others asked to be relocated to a foreign school in the 1930s to escape from Hitlerism. Thus, a strange situation occurred whereby in a remote fortress of Hitler's Germany an anti-nazi spirit prevailed. After the introduction of anti-Jewish legislation, those of the Jewish faith had to leave the school, but the ones that converted to the Christian faith were allowed to stay. From 1943, when the "total war" began, young teachers and graduating German boys were drafted into the Wehrmacht. In 1944, after the Hungarian Nazis rose to power, students of Jewish descent had to hide in the cellar of the School of the German Empire

WHEN DO WE EAT

TITLE: WHEN DO WE EAT
YEAR: 2005
DIR/PROD: SALVADOR LITVAK
COUNTRY: USA
LANGUAGE: English
TIME: minutes
SOURCE: http://www.whendoweeat.com/index2.html
TEXT: "When Do We Eat?" is the story of the "world's fastest Seder" gone horribly awry. It's about an old school dad (Michael Lerner) who's as tough on his sons as his father (Jack Klugman) is on him. On this night, however, one of the boys (Ben Feldman) slips Dad a dose of LSD in order "to give him a new perspective." Meanwhile, Mom (Lesley Ann Warren) brings a handsome stranger to dinner and the kids take sides. By the end of the night, however, Dad's visions turn him into a modern day Moses intent on leading this hungry group to the promised land of family forgiveness. Of course they're all so stubborn, it'd be easier to part the Red Sea. Opening film of the Palm Beach Film Fest. Won Best Film at Dead Center OK City Film Fest.
Born in Santiago, Chile, Salvador Alejandro Litvak moved to New York at age five. As a gangly Jewtino redhead, he forever felt like an outsider, but he was also blessed with a few good friends, lots of adventures, and one preposterous dream after another; dreams he realized by falling on his face early and often, and always getting up for more. These challenges included a state cycling championship, an ivy league degree, rowing on a championship crew team, earning a black belt in tae kwon do, and making When Do We Eat? As a lawyer, Litvak admits he holds the record for lowest billable hours ever logged by an associate at a major corporate firm.

Avenge But One Of My Two Eyes

TITLE: Avenge But One Of My Two Eyes / Nekam Achat Mishtey Eynay
YEAR: 2005
DIR/PROD: Avi Mograbi
COUNTRY: Israel / France
LANGUAGE: Arabic and Hebrew with English Subtitles
TIME: 104 minutes
SOURCE: Les Films du Losange www.LesFilmsduLosange.FR
TEXT: From the myths of Samson and Massada, the younger Israeli generations learn that death is preferable to domination. Today, as the second Intifada is raging, the Palestinians are constantly humiliated by the Israeli army ż peasant are kept from ploughing their fields, children on their way back from school are stranded at checkpoints for hours, an old woman can't even go back homeż Exhausted, these people voice their anger and despair ż just as the Jews did with the Romans or Samson with the Philistines. Israeli filmmaker Avi Mograbi still believes in the power of dialogue, with besieged Palestinians, and with omnipresent Israeli army officials. With the second intifada raging and the Palestinians in greater frustration and despair than ever, Mograbi places his faith in the power of dialogue, with the Palestinians besieged and the Israeli army everywhere. To sustain his argument, the director raises the legends of Samson & Delilah and Massada, which taught early Zionists that death is preferable to surrender. This film was born of Avi Mograbi's intention to reconsider the story of Masada, the fortress emblematic of the Jewish Zealots' uprising against Roman occupation in the 1st century AD, in a new light, by transposing the action to today's breaking news stories. Mograbi explains: "You have to be aware that we Israelis have always been brought up so as to regard Zealots as heroes and freedom fighters that we should identify with... But historian Josephus Flavius in the book 'The War of the Jews' told an altogether different story: the Zealots of Masada are described as murderers, robbers, bandits and extreme nationalists - and definitely not as people to look up to. So i thought it was important to retell the story of Masada. Besides, the fact that the Zealots committed suicide also reflected on today's Palestinian suicide bombers."
Shot with a ferocious cinema verite style, Mograbi's film is a thematic essay, woven around phone conversations he recorded over a three-year period with a Palestinian friend. The friend, an intelligent 35-year-old man, is pessimistic and despondent; living under the daily personal humiliation of Israeli occupation has diminished his will to live. Counterpointing these emotional conversations with shots of the daily degradations Palestinians endure under Israeli occupation -- children being detained from going to school, farmers kept from tilling their fields -- Mograbi puts a personal face on the constant abrasions and indignities faced by both the Israeli soldiers and the Palestinians. Most trenchantly, Mograbi records teaching sessions in which young, impressionable Jewish students are "brainwashed" to subscribe to the "heroism" of the Jews who committed suicide rather than give up to the Romans at Massada; the comparison with present-day Palestinian suicide bombers is linked -- in short, Mograbi rethinks the myth, placing it clearly in terms of a form of zealotry. While crudely made with the swirl of hand-held cameras and the hard slants of on-site compositions, "Avenge But One of My Two Eyes" is a powerful and stirring document. Seen at NYFF, New York Film Festival, October 2005; Cannes, May 2005; Palm Springs, January 2006.

My 100 children

TITLE: My 100 children
YEAR: 2005
DIR/PROD: Amalia Margolin and Oshra Schwartz
COUNTRY: Israel
LANGUAGE: English Subtitles
TIME: 68 minutes
SOURCE: RUTHFILMS.COM http://www.nfct.org.il/movies/My_100_Children_e.htm
TEXT: Ten children from Lena Kuchler's children's home return to their childhood stories, the dilemmas and difficulties they were forced to face during their youth at the end of World War II. Spring 1945: Lena Kuchler, a lonely young woman, who survived the war, arrives at the Jewish Committee Center in Krakow. There on the second floor she discovers dozens of orphan children who survived the war. The plight of these children touches Lena's heart, and she decides to create a home for them. Through a long rehabilitation process, Lena slowly brings the children back to life, and gives them back their childhood. A wave of violent anti-Semitism forces Lena to flee with the children to France, at great risk. In 1949 Lena and the children arrive in Israel. Here Lena completes her mission, and says good-bye to the children as they are accepted into the Schiller Kibbutz as equal members. Seen at San Francisco Jewish Film festival, July 2005

A cantor's tale

TITLE: A cantors tale
YEAR: 2004
DIR/PROD: eric greenberg anjou
COUNTRY: USA
LANGUAGE: English
TIME: 95 minutes
SOURCE: http://jewishvideo.com/cantorstale.htm
TEXT: The tradition of Eastern European Jewish cantorial music is alive and well in modern America in no small part thanks to the efforts of Brooklyn-born Cantor Jacob Mendelson. "Jackie," as he is affectionately called by everyone, explores the American roots of "hazzanut"( Jewish liturgical music) while taking us on a musical voyage that spans the Atlantic, originating in his birthplace of Boro Park, Brooklyn and reaching all the way to Jerusalem. There's music in the air, everywhere. The experience of hearing the world's most renowned cantors in the synagogue was part of a lifestyle that provided American Jewry with a rich cultural heirloom. It is Cantor Mendelson's mission to insure that this legacy is passed on to this and the next generation and generations to come, in a way that is both true to its origins and relevant to the modern world. This feature-length documentary provides a nostalgic journey through family, neighborhood, and tradition. It also treats us to appearances by renowned cantors and aficionados Joseph Malovany, Ben-Zion Miller, Alberto Mizrahi, Matthew Lazar, Neil Shicoff, Jackie Mason and Alan Dershowitz. A Cantor's Tale is very much like "Levy's Real Jewish Rye", you don't have to be Jewish to love it! Seen at San Francisco Jewish Film festival, July 2005

On the objection front

TITLE: On The Objection Front (Ratsiti Lihiyot Gibor)
YEAR: 2004
DIR/PROD: Shiri Tsur
COUNTRY: Israel
LANGUAGE: English Subtitles
TIME: 63 minutes
SOURCE: First Run Icarus Films. http://www.frif.com/new2005/obj.html
TEXT: Made up of Israeli soldiers and reservists who refuse to serve in the occupied territories, the Courage to Refuse movement has caused a stir in Israel. Through candid interviews with the "refuseniks" and their families, this documentary chronicles the controversy and raises crucial questions about civil disobedience, personal ethics, morality and patriotism. In 2002, at the height of the Palestinian uprising, 614 Israeli combat soldiers signed a petition in which they declared their refusal to serve in the occupied territories. The letter opened up a public controversy and a private battle for each of these men. The community they served with pride for many years became a source of harsh criticism and condemnation of their act. In a country where military service is both obligatory and a focus of national pride, these men were no longer the heroes they used to be. In this powerful documentary, we accompany director Shiri Tsur, as she follows the path that led these men to conscientious disobedience. Through eloquent interviews, a tapestry of world views is crafted together, making this documentary both an up-to-date account of Israeli society and an invitation to engage with wider issues about an individual's choice and relationship with society. Winner, Ecumenical Jury Prize, Berlin Film Festival. Seen an SFJFF 2005, UK JFF Fall 2005

Anya (In and Out of Focus)

TITLE: Anya (In and Out of Focus)
YEAR: 2004
DIR/PROD: Marian Marzynski
COUNTRY: poland
LANGUAGE: Polish w/ English Subtitles
TIME: 92 minutes
SOURCE: Marian Marzynski MMarzynski@aol.com Marz Associates 736 Washington Street Brookline, MA 02446 T:617.738.7315
TEXT: Marian Marzynski, an emigre Polish filmmaker, began filming his daughter, Anya, in her infancy in the 1970s as a way of recording her coming of age in America. The film turned out to tell even more about his penchant for smother-loving and puppeteering the girl. The film sketches their adoring but turbulent relationship, yet it's a family portrait that most viewers will recognize themselves in. Some of the film is undiluted comedy. As a grade-schooler, the little chatterbox can't understand why her teacher gives her demerits for speaking out of turn. Marzynski's genial but intrusive probing drives 14-year-old Anya away from the camera near tears when he asks whether she has begun menstruating. It's the long arc of the story that's most interesting, however -- the way history repeats itself. Marzynski, a Jewish Holocaust survivor, and his wife, Regine, an architect, faced the disapproval of her conservative Catholic family when they married, and it's enlightening to see how clumsily they handle the same sorts of issues when Anya begins dating in multiethnic Chicago. With no family of his own, Marzynski goes too far in all directions, giving her more fondling, more attention and more guilt than could be healthy. When the family plays a vocabulary game to help them retain their Polish, he asks, "What is the word for 'disappointment'?" "I heard that all the time," the adult Anya replies. Accustomed to the camera's lifelong gaze, Anya opens up for the kind of frank conversation one rarely hears in a film. While the relationships are tumultuous, there's none of the woe-is-me hand-wringing that infected Jonathan Caouette's "Tarnation." When we leave them, they seem on the path to happily ever after. The film comes full circle with the birth of her son, to whom Marzynski dedicates his film. It's a good legacy. It proves that kids can survive anything. Seen an SFJFF 2005

Jericho's Echo: Punk Rock in the Holy Land

TITLE: Jericho's Echo: Punk Rock in the Holy Land
YEAR: 2005
DIR/PROD: Liz Nord
COUNTRY: Israel, United States
LANGUAGE: English and Hebrew with English Subtitles
TIME: 75 minutes BETA SP
SOURCE: Liz Nord liz@liznord.com 3288 21st Street #2 San Francisco, CA 94110 T:415-377-7274 F:208-474-0084
TEXT: Punk is political, and as Liz Nord's first feature documentary deftly shows, Israel's punk scene takes on politics ferociously. This graphic, dynamic film will inhabit your ears and mind like a bass line that pounds into your consciousness and stays with you for days. The bands featured (all Israeli Jews) cover the political spectrum (the majority lean to the left) with many musical and cultural influences, but they share a struggle for freedom in a country where religious laws, mandatory military service and national conflict hang over their daily lives. From mosh pits in dark clubs to intimate rehearsal sessions, Israeli punks use words and chords to decry the status quo. Some of the punks serve in the military for part of the week (it's hard to fit a Mohawk under a helmet), and then hit the clubs on weekends. Bands with names like Useless I.D., Lo Kosher (not Kosher), and Va'adat Kishut (Decoration Committee) struggle to define themselves in a country where punk is not as popular as it is in England or the United States, but where the issues to be protested against are far graver. In a society where people often talk around difficult subjects, Israeli punk screams its truth about the occupation, war and young people fed up with living in fear. Seen an SFJFF 2005

Pickles, Inc.

TITLE: Pickles, Inc.
YEAR: 2005
DIR/PROD: Dalit Kimor
COUNTRY: Israel
LANGUAGE: English Subtitles
TIME: minutes
SOURCE:
TEXT: Documentary. Uses an all female crew. Eight Arab widows residing in a Northern Israeli village (Tamra, Galilee) start a factory to produce pickles (Azka Pickle Cooperative). They show their economic independence in a village with more traditional ideas for widowed women. The owmen teach themselves basic business skills, including accounting and distribution planning. Samara, who knows Hebrew, is elected to be the Cooperative's director. Alamaza, who owns a car, becomes the sales director. If Israeli Jews loved Abu Ghoush Hummous, will they like Arab pickles?

Sketches of Frank Gehry

TITLE: Sketches of Frank Gehry
YEAR: 2005
DIR/PROD: Sidney Pollack
COUNTRY: USA
LANGUAGE: English
TIME: 83 minutes
SOURCE: Cinetic
TEXT: Pollack captures his friend, architect Frank Gehry (nee Goldberg). This is a love letter from one artist to another. Sydney Pollack, who knew little about architecture except what he himself admired, was invited by his friend, the renowned architect Frank Gehry, to make a documentary about Gehry's life and working methods. Pollack, one of the American cinema's grandest forces - actor, producer and, most famously, director of such enduring classics as They Shoot Horses, Don't They?, Tootsie and The Way We Were - was persuaded. The result of this collaboration between friends is very special: Gehry is naturally at ease in front of Pollack's camera. Their rapport stems from deep mutual respect and the depth of insight culled from their experience as artists.
Armed with a video camera, Pollack dips into the highlights of Gehry's life, tracing his youth, his first marriage and his exponentially growing fame. Facing a creative block early in his career, Gehry ended up in the care of a psychiatrist, whom Pollack interviews and whose understanding of the creative mind unlocked Gehry's imagination. Freed from his crisis, Gehry eventually created such magnificent structures as the Guggenheim Museum in Bilbao and the Walt Disney Concert Hall in Los Angeles. (Gehry is currently creating his first major project in Canada - the transformation of the Art Gallery of Ontario, in the Toronto neighbourhood where he grew up.)
The film presents a very warm and observant working portrait of Gehry as he sits with trusted assistants and colleagues, painstakingly assembling models with scissors and cardboard until he achieves perfection. Pollack does a superb job capturing those moments when spontaneous ideas collide with practical concerns.
This is an affectionate and sensitive film about a man who has dared to dream about buildings that transcend the rectilinear approach that defines so much architecture. Above all, Gehry - modest, energetic and inquisitive - reveals himself to be a consummately charming subject. Seen at Toronto International FF, September 2005. US Release in May 2006.

BEE SEASON

TITLE: BEE SEASON
YEAR: 2005
DIR/PROD: Scott McGehee and David Siegel
COUNTRY: USA
LANGUAGE: English
TIME: 105 minutes
SOURCE: 20th Century Fox
TEXT: Can the shattered shards be made whole again? Naomi Foner Gylenhaal adapted this film script on Myla Goldberg's best selling Jewish books of the same name. Seen at Telluride, September 2005. Richard Gere plays the biblical scholar father. Juliette Binoche is his wife. Flora Cross is their daughter Eliza. Most critics say read the book instead. The film doesn't provide the impact of the book. Instead of being a cantor in Brooklyn (as in the book), the father in the film is a religion professor at UC Berkeley. When lackluster Eliza is found to have a knack at spelling, the father focuses his energy on her, at the expense of his wife and son, Aaron. The family unravels. [Kate Bosworth turns up as a blonde who lures Aaron into Hindu mysticism (not in the book)].

The Man

TITLE: The Man
YEAR: 2005
DIR/PROD: Lee Mayfield
COUNTRY: USA
LANGUAGE: English
TIME: 83 minutes
SOURCE: New Line Cinema
TEXT: Eugene Levy teams up with Samuel L. Jackson. Nebbish Jew (Andy Fiddler) teamed up with hotshot macho ATF agent. Sort of like a reverse 48 HOURS with the nebbish Jew dental supply salesman

No Direction Home

TITLE: No Direction Home
YEAR: 2005
DIR/PROD: Martin Scorsese
COUNTRY: USA
LANGUAGE: English
TIME: 3.5 hours
SOURCE: Emerging Pictures and Paramount Home Video
TEXT: A doc about Bob Dylan that sets the record straight on who he is. Seen at Telluride 2005

Oliver Twist

TITLE: Oliver Twist
YEAR: 2005
DIR/PROD: Roman Polanski
COUNTRY: France-UK-Czech Republic
LANGUAGE: English
TIME: 130 minutes
SOURCE: Sony Entertainment release
TEXT: Ben Kingsley as Fagin, Barney Clark as Oliver. A quiet literary retelling of Oliver Twist. Opens at the time Oliver is 9 and already in the workhouse. Did you know that when David Lean directed the 1948 adaptation, it was delayed for three years in the US due to its controversial porttrayal of the Jewish Fagin. The adaptation has no Jewish problem. Fagin has no hooked nose.

The Passion of Joshua the Jew

TITLE: The Passion of Joshua the Jew La Passione di Giosué l'Ebreo
YEAR: 2005
DIR/PROD: Pasquale Scimeca
COUNTRY: Italy / Spain
LANGUAGE: English Subtitles
TIME: 110 minutes
SOURCE: Arbash Societa' Cooperativa/Institut del Cinema Catalŕ
TEXT: Stars Anna Bonaiuto Toni Bertorelli Marcello Mazzarella. These are religious times - of one sort or another. Regardless of whether you liked it or not, Mel Gibson's The Passion of the Christ struck a nerve, serving notice that no matter how secular modern society has become, there is a deep well of interest in the story of Jesus. This year, the Festival is showing two films that, each in its own way, are reactions to Gibson's interpretation: Abel Ferrara's Mary is one, Pasquale Scimeca's The Passion of Joshua the Jew is the other. Scimeca has chosen to approach the subject from a completely different angle, one that raises a novel set of questions. The film is set during the expulsion of the Jews and Muslims from Spain by the Castilean Queen Isabel, which began in 1492. Into this climate of persecution, a Jewish boy, Joshua (Leonardo Cesare Abude), is born. One of the elders, the proud Don Isaac (Toni Bertorelli), who is a friend to the queen, predicts Joshua will be the new Messiah. When he decides to follow his people into exile, Don Isaac is determined to ensure Joshua's safe passage. Time passes and Joshua grows into a curious and intelligent young man. During his flight to Naples, he finds himself in the company of both Jews and Muslims, and his questions about Jesus evoke an eclectic variety of responses. If Jesus was a Jew, he wonders, why then must the Jews flee? And why are there so many messiahs, each with their own name and religion? Joshua and his family's arrival in the safe haven of Naples provides only temporary respite and they are soon forced to move onward to Sicily. There, Joshua eventually finds himself absorbed into the theatrical religious rituals of the casazza (a Catholic layperson's chapel), where he slowly and inexorably assumes the role of Jesus. The local priests soon come to see his questions as disruptive and the inevitable course of the narrative is played out in front of Joshua's horrified family. As life turns into theatre, theatre turns into life - or rather, a story that bears on all our lives. Seen at Venice Film festival and Toronto FF 2005

Sisters (Hermanas)

TITLE: Sisters (Hermanas)
YEAR: 2005
DIR/PROD: Julia Solomonoff / Vanessa Ragone, Florencia Enghel, Mariela Besuievsky, Gerardo Herrero, Pablo Bossi
COUNTRY: Argentina / Spain
LANGUAGE: English Subtitles
TIME: 88 minutes
SOURCE: Cruzdelsur Zona Audiovisual / Patagonik Film Group
TEXT: Principal Cast: Ingrid Rubio, Valeria Bertuccelli, Adrián Navarro, Nicolás Pauls, Milton de La Canal. Young Argentine filmmakers are confronting their nation's most recent military dictatorship (1976 to 1983) in new ways. Since Luis Puenzo's 1985 Academy Award(r)-winning The Official Story first brought the atrocities to light, Argentine directors have tried to make sense of those years when twenty-five thousand of their countrymen suddenly went "missing." Marco Bechis's Garage Olimpo detailed the horrors that went on in the concentration camps, while Albertina Carri's documentary The Blonds attempted to reconstruct the kidnapping of her parents. Julia Solomonoff's directorial debut, Sisters, offers a more subdued way of dealing with her country's tumultuous past: it is the story of two sisters separated in 1975, a year before the regime takes control, who are reunited in 1984, a year after the regime has been toppled. Natalia Levin (Ingrid Rubio) fled to Spain in 1975 after her boyfriend and fellow militant Martin (Nicolás Pauls) mysteriously disappears in Buenos Aires. In 1984, her sister Elena (Valeria Bertuccelli) moves with her husband and young son to Austin, Texas. When Natalia goes to Texas to visit Elena and to find out about the unpublished novel her father wrote before his death, she discovers that it recounts her family's experiences during the dictatorship and, despite her painful memories of Argentina, she begins to wonder more and more about the past - and about Martin. How did the authorities know where he was hiding? What really happened to him? Elena is no help in answering these questions and the tension between the two sisters mounts. Despite their differences - Elena is as conservative and conformist as the suburb where she lives while Natalia is liberal-minded and worldly - they share a very deep love and a painful history. Sisters is about coming to terms with one's past and about the guilt that many survivors feel simply for continuing to live while loved ones have suffered. Their healing process cannot truly begin until the truth comes out and they face what they have done - or have not done. Intelligently constructed and beautifully told with persuasive performances by Bertuccelli and Rubio, Sisters is a compelling and compassionate debut. Seen at Toronto International Film festival, September 2005

Memory for Max, Claire, Ida and company

TITLE: Memory for Max, Claire, Ida and company
YEAR: 2005
DIR/PROD: Allan King
COUNTRY: Canada
LANGUAGE: English
TIME: 112 minutes
SOURCE: Allan King Associates Ltd., Toronto Ontario
TEXT: DOCUMENTARY BY THE Master, Allan King. Principal Cast: With: Claire Mandell, Max Trachter, Ida Orliffe, Fay Silverman, Rachel Baker, Helen Mosten-Growe. Certainly one of our most distinguished filmmakers, Allan King follows Dying at Grace, his remarkable confrontation with mortality, with another complex, emotional look at the human condition. King's uncompromising, seminal works, such as Warrendale and A Married Couple, have used the camera to reveal the emotions and behaviour of groups of people within institutional settings. In the extraordinary Memory for Max, Claire, Ida and company, he continues this investigation by examining the effects aging has on the mind. King's signature style employs no narration, no direction of action and no conventional interviews. Shooting with a small crew over four months, the filmmakers worked with residents at the Baycrest Centre for Geriatric Care in Toronto. King's honest, transparent approach and his aspiration that his subjects' experiences would offer useful insights for others gained him considerable access to both the residents and their families and caregivers. Several individuals' experiences form the core of the documentary; we witness moments of humour, love, anger, flirtation, happiness and loneliness. We observe the daily life of Max, who can usually be found wandering down the hallways with cane in hand, or enjoying singing the day away and spending time with his friend, Claire. The indomitable Ida is a former caregiver who wants to be more active but is physically incapable. On the other hand, Helen has changed so completely that she is no longer able to recognize her own daughter. Memory for Max, Claire, Ida and company is a profoundly moving testament to people confronted with a frightening loss of memory. It is truly heartbreaking to follow the patients' relatives as they face the prospect of spending years caring for loved ones whose memories flicker or fade but who retain spirited and immediate feelings and desires. The inevitable passage of time forms the backdrop against which King expertly documents the need for and, ultimately, the power of companionship, conveying much about what it is to be human. Seen at Toronto Intnl Film festival, September 2005

51 Birch Street

TITLE: 51 Birch Street
YEAR: 2005
DIR/PROD: doug block
COUNTRY: USA
LANGUAGE: English
TIME: 88 minutes
SOURCE: Copacetic Pictures/HBO/ZDF
TEXT: DOCUMENTaRY. Given the opportunity, would you want to know your family's secrets? "When it comes to your parents, maybe ignorance is bliss," observes filmmaker Doug Block well into this profoundly bittersweet exploration of his mother and father's fifty-five-year marriage. Yet, if your father married his former secretary, Kitty, only a few months after the death of his wife, questions would inevitably arise. And if three boxes of your mother's soul-baring journals were found in the attic, you'd hope to find some answers - wouldn't you? In many ways, the marriage of Mike and Mina Block embodies the storied staidness of the fifties: they meet before World War II, but sparks only fly upon Mike's return. "He was really quite a gorgeous guy," Mina recalls. "It was one of those instances of tremendous physical attraction, and stuff like that." They wed, move to the sleepy suburbs and have three children in four years. Dad brings home the bacon and Mom runs things around their house at 51 Birch Street - the classic story in every sense. "Nothing is really direct, everything is circuitous," hints Mina, shortly before her death. Doug, who feels a deep connection with his mother, starts to read between the lines, asking: "Why do I suddenly care that Kitty was at my bar mitzvah?" His eighty-three-year-old father, always something of a stranger to Doug and his sisters, remains emotionally distant with his children, while his relationship with Kitty reveals a warm, passionate man. And then there are Mom's diaries. With twists and turns, sadness and humour, 51 Birch Street surprises with layers of reflection on love, marriage, fidelity and our constantly shifting perspectives on our parents. Intimate and universal, this insightful personal documentary offers a multi-generational snapshot of the complicated expectations we have of ourselves and those closest to us. Seen at Toronto Intnl Film festival, 2005

China blue

TITLE: China blue
YEAR: 2005
DIR/PROD: Micha Peled
COUNTRY: USA
LANGUAGE: Cantonese, English, Mandarin, Sichuan
TIME: 86 minutes
SOURCE: Teddy Bear Films, USA
TEXT: Sixteen-year-old Jasmine is a thread-cutter at the Lifeng Factory, one of dozens of denim manufacturers in Shaxi, South China. As she puts it, she makes the "big and fat" jeans we wear. Like her new friends at the factory - Liping, a seamstress, and Orchid, a zipper installer - Jasmine is one of hundreds of millions of people, mostly young women, who make up the largest pool of cheap labour in the world. Excited to be helping her family when she gets the job, Jasmine sets out from the farm to the factory, knowing little about the labour conditions in Shaxi. Soon she is working gruelling sixteen-hour days for scant wages. Disco-dancing and modelling lessons from Orchid and midnight trips downtown to buy "energy tea" with Liping provide Jasmine with camaraderie and some relief from the onerous production cycle and harsh working conditions. Shot clandestinely, China Blue paints a nuanced, thorough and ultimately moving portrait of the daily lives of the anonymous young workers who make our clothes. As well, this tender documentary illuminates the economic pressures applied by Western companies and their human consequences. "In the U.S. and Canada, they can't live without denim," says Mr. Lam, the factory owner. "That is our great advantage." The Western buyers he meets care about one thing: impossibly low costs. A factory that paid minimum wage and allowed its workers sufficient rest would price itself out of competition. Trapped by these oppressive forces, the resourceful Jasmine and her feisty friends endure with dreams of better jobs or operating businesses of their own. Contrary to the notion that these girls offer a pliant, obedient work force, the film reveals glimpses of an emerging activism: a bold willingness, as Jasmine asserts, "to pull the Tiger's whiskers." Coming into a sense of self-worth, Jasmine sends a gentle message to the West in the pocket of a pair of jeans. Tempering the giddy, greedy imperatives of the market, China Blue offers remarkable access into the other new China. Seen at Toronto International Film festival, September 2005

Diameter of the Bomb

TITLE: Diameter of the Bomb
YEAR: 2005
DIR/PROD: Steven Silver, Andrew Quigley
COUNTRY: UK Canada
LANGUAGE: English Arabic and Hebrew
TIME: 86 minutes
SOURCE: Rainmaker FIlms/National Film Board of Canada
TEXT: Steven Silver and Andrew Quigley's Diameter of the Bomb confronts the devastating aftermath of a 2002 suicide bombing in Jerusalem: twenty dead, fifty injured. For the relatives of the victims, reminders of their loved ones and their sudden deaths lurk everywhere in this residential neighbourhood, even two years later. Everyday surroundings constantly re-open wounds, and the lives impacted by this catastrophic event will never be the same. From the window of their synagogue, Shari's parents can see the bus stop where their daughter was killed. Her mother's pain is exacerbated by the fact that she never had the opportunity to say good-bye properly. Theirs is just one story, one loss among many. Reminiscences and regrets give way in Silver and Quigley's documentary to the discourses of a chilling new science, one peculiar to our age. Forensics experts explain the ways they can identify bombers and victims in the destructive wake they leave behind. Firemen detail the minutiae of how a bomb blast actually kills you. Meanwhile, the Israeli army exacts vengeance for the death, perpetuating the grisly cycle. Suspicion comes to dominate the lives of those affected by the tragedy; a driver on the bus route begins to discriminate among people based on their accents. The film features a plethora of unique and often unsettling footage, ranging from Israeli army forensic images, to Hamas training videos, to the bomber's own home movies. Well-crafted and remarkably restrained, Diameter of the Bomb is an alarming snapshot of our times. In a period when the most extreme acts of individuals or governments are justified on the basis of the flimsiest evidence imaginable and defended with the most appalling rhetoric, Diameter of the Bomb does something utterly essential. Emphasizing the effects of war and strife on a neighbourhood, on families, on frightened survivors and mourning mothers, the film takes the classic definition of terrorism - spreading fear and suspicion among the civilian populace - and brings it home in the most direct way possible. Seen at Toronto International Film festival, September 2005

At The Green Line

TITLE: At The Green Line
YEAR: 2005
DIR/PROD: Jesse Atlas
COUNTRY: USA
LANGUAGE: English, Arabic, Hebrew w/English subtitles
TIME: 53 minutes
SOURCE: Jesse Atlas 924 N. Sierra Bonita Ave. #4 Los Angeles, CA 90046 Phone: 917-520-0447 jesse@team-atlas.com www.atthegreenline.com
TEXT: Produced prior to the Israeli pullout from Gaza, this soul-searching documentary about the Israeli occupation of lands seized after the 1967 war examines the crisis of conscience faced by soldiers in the Israeli military on the frontlines of the conflict. In 2000, with the start of the second intifada, Israelis and Palestinians were locked in an escalating series of suicide bombings and retaliatory military incursions. For soldiers who joined the Courage to Refuse movement, the difficulty rested in reconciling individual morality with responsibility and love of country. Despite unblinking support for a strong military to defend Israel, many rejected taking part in actions in the contentious areas, questioning policies like the separation fence or targeted assassinations that they believe added to the cycle of violence. In addition to interviews with Palestinians and Israeli defense forces opposed to the occupation are equally heartfelt conversations with soldiers who see no other way to protect their homeland. Stopping at various posts and villages along the Green Line--the border between Israel and the occupied territories--the film bears witness to the daily tensions that have permeated life on both sides. - Seen at HamptonsFilmFest.org, October 19-23, 2005 and BJFF November 2005

Be Fruitful and Multiply

TITLE: Be Fruitful and Multiply
YEAR: 2005
DIR/PROD: Shosh Shalam
COUNTRY: Israel
LANGUAGE: English, Hebrew w/English subtitles
TIME: 50 minutes
SOURCE:
TEXT: How does it feel to have been pregnant or nursing for 25 out of 26 years of your married life? This and other questions are posed openly and directly in this film, and they expose the consequences of the Biblical commandment "Be fruitful and multiply"-the mother of all blessings-upon the Ultra-Orthodox Jewish women. We are given a rare opportunity to enter the Ultra Orthodox Jewish woman's world where the center of her life is pregnancy, childbirth, and constant nursing. She doesn't have the freedom to determine the course of her life; she serves God via the womb. The film follows the stories of 4 Ultra Orthodox women. Yentel, from the Mea Shearim neighborhood in Jerusalem, expresses the pain of her oppressed friends. The personal stories of the other three women are interwoven into Yentel's, as she turns from an obedient wife internalizing the strict social code of her society, into an independent woman who rebels against social conventions. BE FRUITFUL AND MULTIPLY is a story of women's oppression in an Ultra-Orthodox patriarchal society that enslaves women socially and ideologically, leaving them unable to develop inner freedom and negating their right to critical thought. Seen at HamptonsFilmFest.org, October 19-23, 2005

Boynton Beach Bereavement Club

TITLE: Boynton Beach Bereavement Club
YEAR: 2005
DIR/PROD: COUNTRY: USA
LANGUAGE: English
TIME: 104 minutes
SOURCE:
TEXT: Cast: Brenda Vaccaro (Marilyn), Len Cariou (Jack), Dyan Cannon (Lois), Joseph Bologna (Harry), Sally Kellerman (Sandy), Michael Nouri (Donald), Renee Taylor (Platinum Blond), Mal Z. Lawrence (Marty) BOYNTON BEACH BEREAVEMENT CLUB is a romantic comedy about our amazing capacity to rebound and fall in love.... at any age. LOIS (Dyan Cannon), HARRY (Joseph Bologna), MARILYN (Brenda Vaccaro), SANDY (Sally Kellerman) and JACK (Len Cariou) live in an "Active Adult" community in Boynton Beach, Florida. Their lives intersect when they meet at a local Bereavement Club, where they've gone to find emotional support after the loss of a loved one. But soon they each find themselves on a journey they could never have predicted, when they reenter the "dating scene" after many decades -- only to find that it's a whole new world out there. As the leaders of the original Baby Boomer generation now approach retirement age, the concept of what it means to be older is dramatically changing. (Hey, Mick Jagger is a grandfather!) So those who think that new love and romance end well before retirement age are in for a reality check. No one sees themselves as becoming old, and the residents of Boynton Beach aren't about to start. In a world where 60 is fast becoming the new 40, BOYNTON BEACH BEREAVEMENT CLUB shows us that it's never too late to fall in love with ourselves and others, whatever the age. Seen at HamptonsFilmFest.ORG, October 2005

Coney Island, 1945

TITLE: Coney Island, 1945
YEAR: 2005
DIR/PROD: Jeremiah Zagar
COUNTRY: USA
LANGUAGE: English
TIME: 4 minutes
SOURCE: just google the director
TEXT: Cast: Isaiah Zagar, Jacob N. Honig, Sarah Hatfield Pen and ink becomes nostalgia for an old man as he recalls his Mother, his boyhood, the joy of the Brooklyn seashores. Seen at HamptonsFilmFest.ORG, October 2005

Song of songs

TITLE: Song of songs
YEAR: 2005
DIR/PROD: Josh Appignanesi
COUNTRY: UK
LANGUAGE: English
TIME: 80 minutes
SOURCE:
TEXT: With Natalie Press and Joel Chalfen. Ruth (Natalie Press) is a devoutly religious young woman who is seeking meaning in Orthodox Jewish life. She has just returned from a seminary in Israel to the family home in north London to look after her widowed mother who is dying. Her brother, David, (Joel Chalfen) estranged himself from the family and teaches English at a further education college in London. When Ruth tries to bring her brother David back to the family, the result is a forbidden game under the guise of religious law, verging on the darkest realms of sexual obsession. Topical in its examination of the links between religious belief and violence, Song of Songs, draws on modern European cinema and biblical sources to explore the 'return of religion'. Seen at UK Jewish Film Festival, November 2005

The Tale of The Goat

TITLE: The Tale of The Goat
YEAR: 2004
DIR/PROD: Max Cohen
COUNTRY: USA
LANGUAGE: English
TIME: 5 minutes
SOURCE: Max Cohen maxrcohen@gmail.com
TEXT: A short hand drawn animation in Yiddish. Adapted from the story by S. Y. Agnon. Cohen made "The Goat," which is a father and son tale (adapted from a story by S.Y. Agnon) about the son's quest to find out what happened to the family goat
From SFGATE: ...while studying film at Vassar College. Born in Brooklyn, he moved to upstate New York as a teenager to a farm with goats and this formative experience, coupled with his budding interest in Yiddish, inspired him to make his pioneering film. Although Cohen didn't complete his film degree, his black and white animation won the coveted "Palme d'Schnorrer" award for short films at the Heeb Film Festival (as in the magazine, Heeb: The New Jew Review) in London last December. Here at the SFJFF, it's the opening short preceding "A Cantor's Tale," a feature documentary about the glory days of chazzanut -- the Jewish cantorial music that flourished in New York City in the 50s; the program screens three times -- in SF, Mountain View and Berkeley. Although he's already at work on his next movie -- which would be the second Yiddish-language animation in existence -- when he returns home to Brooklyn he'll be starting his new job as an emergency medical technician "riding ambulances around every borough of the city." All of his Vassar friends enrolled in graduate school, but Cohen wanted to do "something that was helping." That something didn't include "signing up for the army and dying" either, so he became an EMT. Talking about the Brooklyn of today, Cohen said that all the neighborhoods are gentrified. In Williamsburg, the Hassidim are putting up signs in Yiddish saying "God, Please Save This Place from Artists!"

Turn Left At The End Of The World (Sof Ha´Olam Smola)

TITLE: Turn Left At The End Of The World (Sof Ha´Olam Smola)
YEAR: 2004
DIR/PROD: Avi Nesher
COUNTRY: Israel/France
LANGUAGE: Hebrew, French and English with English subtitles
TIME: 108 minutes
SOURCE: A United King Films presentation of a Davis Films/Artomas Communications/Metro Communications production
TEXT: The year is 1969 and in an isolated Israeli village on the edge of the Negev two Jewish immigrant families, one from Morocco and the other from India, become unlikely neighbors who have nothing in common but the dream of a new life. Everyone tries to assert their particular cultural identities, the Indian family by putting together a cricket team and the Moroccan family by trying to disrupt the game. Meanwhile, each family has a teenage daughter negotiating the landscape of the sexual revolution. When the sultry Moroccan, Nicole, and the headstrong Indian, Sara, become friends, their youth and desire for freedom help them to overcome their differences. In this isolated place, the road to harmony takes many surprising and comical twists and turns and is beautifully filmed against a desert background. Audience Grand Prix for Best Picture at Taormina Film Festival "Charming, totally original, very funny and clever. Israel's best hope in years for Best Foreign Picture Oscar" Time Out, Tel Aviv.
Note: One had not expected an Israeli film in the Asian competition section to have any kind of Indian connection. But "Turn Left at the End of the World" by Avi Nesher is full of Indian actors. It is about Indian and Moroccan Jews who go and settle in a town in Israel. The Moroccans like to think they are French while the Indians think they are British. As they are forced to live together, they find that they have to smoothen many rough edges. Nesher, the Isreali-born, US-based director of the film, has chosen non-Jewish actors from India to play Jews. He says he is pleased with the abundance of talent in India and chose the actors like Parmeet Sethi and Kruttika Desai because of their suitability for the roles.

The Devil and Manny Shmeckstein

TITLE: The Devil and Manny Shmeckstein
YEAR: 2004
DIR/PROD: Jim Goodman
COUNTRY: USA
LANGUAGE: English
TIME: 7 minutes
SOURCE: Jim Goodman Productions, Goodman Media Design 552 N. Edgemere Dr., W. Allenhurst, NJ 07711 PHONE/FAX: 732-663-1864
TEXT: Animation. At his death on stage, tired and washed-up comedian Manny Schmeckstein finds himself consigned to eternal damnation for the unpardonable sin of a lifetime's worth of bad jokes. Unless he can get just one laugh!
In filmmaker Jim Goodman's mind, a person doesn't necessarily go to Hell because he was bad. He can end up there because he stinks at his craft, hobby, or job. For the human in Goodman's claymation short "The Devil & Manny Schmeckstein" (2004), poor comedy skills lead to an elevator ride to Hell. Manny (voiced by Dick Rodstein) is a standup comedian probably in his late sixties. When the film begins, he is doing a set with a brick wall and one ceiling light for a stage. He starts talking about his wife Beatrice who was packing her bags. He tries to finish the joke but the audience doesn't respond very well. Manny gets nervous, sweats raindrops, and collapses next to the microphone. He doesn't wake up. His soul leaves his body. An elevator door appears in the middle of the brick wall and opens. Manny cautiously enters and finds himself in the company of a man in a suit. This man introduces himself as the Devil (also voiced by Dick Rodstein) and explains to Manny that ineffectively performing a task is sufficient enough reason to land one underground as opposed to above the clouds. The Devil gives Manny a chance to make it to Heaven: make a resident of Hell laugh. Winner of a handful of film festival awards for Best Animation (Boston International and New Jersey International) and Claymation (Garden State), "The Devil & Manny Schmeckstein" is artfully created, humorously written, and re-interprets the common definition of and difference between Hell and Heaven

Distortion

TITLE: Distortion
YEAR: 2005
DIR/PROD: Haim Bouzaglo
COUNTRY: Israel / France
LANGUAGE: Hebrew with English ST
TIME: 103 minutes
SOURCE: Mazel productions, Israel
TEXT: Set in Israel during the Intifada where everyday life continues amidst suicide attacks and periods of great anxiety and tension. A scriptwriter is contracted to present a new theatre play but experiences a writer's block. His girlfriend, a documentary filmmaker, is working on a film about a former soldier who opened a business but went bankrupt because of the economic situation. The scriptwriter, desperate for a story, hires a private detective in the hope that he will add some interest to his life. He asks him to trail his girlfriend's growing involvement with the former soldier. The real life story, the theatre play and the documentary are interwoven as the film reaches a surprising theatrical climax.
Peter Vander Haar writes: ... Scenes of Haim writing and blocking his new play are interspersed with those of a terrorist, plastic explosives belt concealed beneath a Polo t-shirt with an American flag on it, as he cases various establishments in search of a target. His presence is felt throughout the film, though not specifically, as each of the characters tends to drink or drug too much and are prone to various stress-induced tics and mannerisms. Bouzaglo increases the tension through the use of jump cuts and discordant noise cues. The techniques are effective, for the most part, until the final third of the movie. This is about the time Bouzaglo decides to trot out each of his characters' sexual peccadilloes. Two of the actors in the play are having an affair, while the lead is given to soliciting gay street hustlers. Haim himself is comparatively low key, contenting himself with sniffing Anat's panties as a means to assuage his loneliness, but it's all unnecessary given the very real drama going on around them and our anticipation at what's going to happen when Anat and her new boyfriend see their antics recreated on the stage. For all that, the broader themes of fatalism and powerlessness are put across very effectively in "Distortion." Bouzaglo quite capably conveys to the audience a small taste of what it must be like to try and live one's life surrounded by violence and uncertainty. And frankly, a small taste is probably all that most of us would care to have." Seen at UK Jewish Film Fest, October 2005

Fateless (Sorstalanság)

TITLE: Fateless (Sorstalanság)
YEAR: 2005
DIR/PROD: Lajos Koltai
COUNTRY: Hungary/Germany/UK
LANGUAGE: Hungarian/English/German with English subtitles
TIME: 140 minutes
SOURCE:
TEXT: Magnificent Holocaust drama based on the novel by Imre Kertész, 2002 Nobel Prize laureate and concentration camp survivor. This profoundly moving drama offers a new perspective on one of history's darkest periods. Fourteen-year-old Gyuri's response to his experience during the Holocaust is curiously ambivalent. In the camps, he tries to adjust to his ever-worsening situation by imputing human motives to his inhuman captors. By imposing a logic, his logic, that of a bright, sensitive teenager, he maintains a precarious semblance of normalcy. On his return to his native Budapest, Gyuri senses the indifference, even hostility, of people on the street. Vast in scale, yet boasting a remarkable historical detail, and with a sweeping score by Ennio Morricone, this is a true testament to the resilience of the human spirit. (note: the actor grew 4 inches during the filming) Seen at UK Jewish Film Fest, October 2005

The First Time I was Twenty

TITLE: The First Time I was Twenty
YEAR: 2004
DIR/PROD: Lorraine Levy
COUNTRY: France
LANGUAGE: French with English ST
TIME: 93 minutes
SOURCE: Elodie Henneton Elodie.HENNETON@pathe.com Pathe Distribution 10 rue Lincoln Paris 75008 T:140-76-9438 F:140-76-9194
TEXT: With great wit and musical talent on her side, Hannah is the misfit who strolls into pride of place in a pre-feminist era, hostile world. Sixteen-year-old Hannah lives in the Paris suburbs of post-war France with her doting mother, her garage mechanic father and her two pretty sisters. She is not interested in dating, and the famous school jazz band that she desperately wants to join is traditionally all-male and refuses to change. Hannah's adolescence is turning out to be a trial, especially when pranks aimed at her turn from gentle teasing to outright anti-Semitism. By remaining true to herself, Hannah finds the courage to score points for girls who do not spend their lives chasing boys, the cultural outsiders and for fat girls everywhere. The First Time I Was Twenty takes the traditional story of a likeable misfit and lifts it to an uncommon level of charm, humor and poignancy. Seen at UK Jewish Film Fest, October 2005

Forever Yours (Evig Din)

TITLE: Forever Yours (Evig Din)
YEAR: 2005
DIR/PROD: Monica Csango
COUNTRY: NORWAY
LANGUAGE: Norwegian, Hungarian and English with English subtitles
TIME: 56 minutes
SOURCE:
TEXT: A woman's everlasting love for her husband, who apparently died during World War II, turns into a captivating mystery of family deceipt and intrigue. When her granddaughter discovers a photo from Mumbai, India, and suspects that her grandfather did not die in the Holocaust, but escaped and changed his life forever, she begins an emotional investigation that leads to a momentous revelation. The loyalty, love and stubborn pride of her grandmother provides the backdrop for a disturbing journey towards the truth. This mysterious love story is woven around rare, vivid and romantic pre-war archival film footage that the grandmother has treasured for so many years as her only link with her glamorous husband. Seen at UK Jewish Film Fest, October 2005

The Future is Behind You

TITLE: The Future is Behind You
YEAR: 2004
DIR/PROD: Abigail Child
COUNTRY: USA
LANGUAGE: English and German with English subtitles
TIME: 21 minutes
SOURCE: http://www.abigailchild.com/
TEXT: "A fictional story from an anonymous family archive from 1930's Europe, reconstructed to emphasise gender acculturation in two sisters who play, race, fight, kiss and grow up together under a shadow of oncoming history. The Future is Behind You excavates gestures to get at the heart of narrative; it seeks a bridge between private and public histories." Abigail Child

God on Our Side

TITLE: God on Our Side
YEAR: 2005
DIR/PROD: Michal Pfeffer and Uri Kranot
COUNTRY: Netherlands
LANGUAGE: None
TIME: 7 minutes
SOURCE: http://www.tindrumanimation.com/
TEXT: Animation. Inspired by Picasso's Guernica (1937) and focussing on the Israeli- Palestinian conflict. The question is 'What hope is there for a child born into this circle of loss?' Inspired by Picasso's Guernica (1937), "God on our side" is fundamentally about the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. In the name of God, people are infused with rage and violence. Fear leads to brutality and vengeance follows. What hope is there for a child born into this circle of loss? This is a short animated film (07:00 min), in cut-out technique combining pieces of paper, objects and drawings. The film was made during 2004 in the Netherlands institute for animation films. The film had been selected for many short film, animation and documentary festivals around the world. The music was composed by Uri Kranot (a member of Hapuritanim Hatze'irim ) and recorded live (with members of Yuppies With Jeeps ) while screening the film, during August 2004 in Jerusalem. Musicians: Daniel kitczales- violin, guitar and piano Shery Weinstein- percussion Erez Nataf- Oud Alon Nataf- Nei Grisha Geles- Cello Yael Tai- vocals Noam Yaish- banjo Uri Kranot- flute sound and mix : Noam Yaish

Avinu Malkenu

TITLE: Avinu Malkenu
YEAR: 2001
DIR/PROD: Michal Pfeffer and Uri Kranot
COUNTRY:
LANGUAGE: None
TIME: 3 minutes
SOURCE: http://www.tindrumanimation.com/
TEXT: Animation. A fable of lost people in search of salvation. Uses sand animation

Hiding From Hitler

TITLE: Hiding From Hitler
YEAR: 2005
DIR/PROD: Sue Read
COUNTRY: UK
LANGUAGE: English
TIME: 50 minutes
SOURCE:
TEXT: Over 1.5 million children perished in the Holocaust, but unbelievably, a few thousand children survived in hiding. This is their story. Now, as adults, they talk about living alone, often in dark terrifying places or constantly on the run, scavenging for food. As children, aged between six and fifteen, often without their parents, they were forced to hide in sewers, holes in the ground, cupboards or caves for up to two years. They talk about the terrible conditions and the fear of being found and shot, and the bravery of those friends and strangers who risked death to save their lives. This is a story of courage and triumph. The director and Holocaust survivors appearing in the film will attend the screening and panel discussion. This film was shown in 2005/2006 as part of the UK JFF Holocaust Education events for schools and colleges.

The Holocaust Tourist: Whatever Happened To Never Again?

TITLE: The Holocaust Tourist: Whatever Happened To Never Again?
YEAR: 2004
DIR/PROD: Jes Benstock
COUNTRY: UK
LANGUAGE: English
TIME: 10 minutes
SOURCE:
TEXT: Winner of the UK JFF Short Film Fund 2004. Not another sad film about the Holocaust, but a wry animated documentary about Auschwitz hot-dogs and Krakow's kitsch Judaica. How is dark tourism changing history?

In Her Shoes

TITLE: In Her Shoes
YEAR: 2005
DIR/PROD: Curtis Hanson
COUNTRY: USA
LANGUAGE: English
TIME: 130 minutes
SOURCE:
TEXT: Based on Jennifer Weiner's best selling novel and starring Cameron Diaz, Toni Collette and Shirley Maclaine. An alternately hilarious and heart-rending story of two sisters with very little in common except their passion for fancy shoes! Maggie and Rose Feller are best friends and polar opposites when it comes to values, goals and personal style. Maggie (Cameron Diaz) is a party girl who barely graduated from high school and believes that her biggest asset is her attractiveness to the opposite sex. Rose (Toni Collette) is a Princeton educated attorney at a top law firm in Philadelphia, with a heavy work schedule and a low self esteem regarding her physical appearance. After a calamitous falling out, the two sisters lose contact with each other until the discovery of their maternal grandmother (Shirley MacLaine), who they thought was dead, enables them to make peace with themselves and with each other.

Jai

TITLE: Jai
YEAR: 2004
DIR/PROD: Ariel Zylbersztejn
COUNTRY: Mexico
LANGUAGE: Spanish with English ST
TIME: 9 minutes
SOURCE: Jessy Vega promofilmfest@gmail. com Crimson Forest Films CNI CANAL 40, WTC MÉXICO, PISO 41 Montecito #38, col. Napoles 03810 T:55-1686-2781 F:55-5488-3263 http://www.crimsonforestfilms.com/
TEXT: When a young Mexican Jewish girl innocently asks her grandmother about the numbers tattooed on her arm, the answer is a surprise. Ariel Zylbersztejn was born in Mexico City in 1980. He has a major in Communication from Anahuac University. Since then his career starts in this difficut task of transmitting emotions. In the year 2002, he has studied at the New York Film Academy. That's how he begins his professional career. From Nowadays Ariel is finishing his latest documentary Aviv in Israel and is preparing his next feature film script. Shown at NY Jewish Film, January 2006

The Last Scene (Haseret Shel Menucha)

TITLE: The Last Scene (Haseret Shel Menucha)
YEAR: 2004
DIR/PROD: Eliezer Shapiro
COUNTRY: Israel
LANGUAGE: Hebrew with English ST
TIME: 50 minutes
SOURCE:
TEXT: For seventy years, Menucha has remained silent. The image of their parting at the train station in Warsaw in the Spring of 1935 remains engraved in her memory. The face of five-year-old Menucha is pressed against the window of the train, her eyes, wide with horror, stare at the scene on the platform. Her sister Mindel, eleven years old, is clinging desperately to their mother's dress. The piercing whistle of the train fills the air. The mother, in a single movement, tears away from the grasp of her daughter and rushes to board the train. The clatter of the wheels erases the image of the child vainly chasing the vanishing train. The film follows Menucha's attempt to recreate that defining moment in her childhood with a fictional scene. She sensitively documents the challenges that she experiences in her efforts to transform a blurry memory into a cinematic image. Winner of the Beslau Jewish Film Festival in Spain, appeared at UK Jewish FF in November 2005

Little Jerusalem (La Petite Jérusalem)

TITLE: Little Jerusalem (La Petite Jérusalem)
YEAR: 2005
DIR/PROD: Karin Albou
COUNTRY: France
LANGUAGE: French, Arabic and Hebrew with English Subtitles
TIME: 96 minutes
SOURCE: http://www.ocean-films.com/lapetitejerusalem/ eva.simonet@wanadoo.fr
TEXT: A subtle and thought-provoking film, set in the Paris suburb of Sarcelles known as "little Jerusalem" because a large number of Jews have settled there. Laura is eighteen and she is torn between her religious upbringing and her studies in philosophy, a subject that fascinates her and offers her a different view of the world. Little Jerusalem by Karin Albou (La Petite Jerusalem, France, 2005, 94 min.). Desire is a persistent and occasionally pernicious thing in Karin Albou's exquisitely rendered family drama. The film takes its title from a suburb of Paris, home to a large Jewish population. Laura is a young woman who lives in a small apartment with her family: her sister Mathilde, her Orthodox husband, their four children, and her Tunisian mother. Passion erupts when Laura falls in love with a Muslim man, and she must choose between following the tenets of her faith and her own desires. In French with English. Introduced by Lisa Nesselson, Paris-based film critic for Variety. Description adapted from the Vancouver International Film Festival. Winner of the SACD Screenwriting Award, 2005

Line Of Life (Ligne de Vie)

TITLE: Line Of Life (Ligne de Vie)
YEAR: 2005
DIR/PROD: Serge Avédikian
COUNTRY: France
LANGUAGE:
TIME: 11 minutes
SOURCE:
TEXT: Animation. The artist draws his last drawing, on a wall. A unique depiction of an artist struggling to survive life in the camps.

Looking For The Lost Voice (Be'ikvot Ha'kol Ha'avood)

TITLE: Looking For The Lost Voice (Be'ikvot Ha'kol Ha'avood)
YEAR: 2005
DIR/PROD: Tzipi Trope
COUNTRY: Israel
LANGUAGE: Hebrew and Arabic with English subtitles
TIME: 68 minutes
SOURCE: Maya Films
TEXT: VARIETY MAGAZINE WRITES: On Aug. 4, 2002, Omri Goldin, a sergeant in the Israeli army and the lead vocalist for a punk band called Lucy's Pussy, was killed in a suicide bus bombing in Galilee; his girlfriend was able to survive because Goldin's body absorbed the shock and shrapnel. Goldin's father, Amiram, was already involved in the Peace Now movement and the construction of a co-ooperative Palestinian-Israeli industrial complex in Galilee. Omri's death fueled his passion for peace and stability. Unfortunately, Trope fails to widen the story to make it more than a family's mourning and a restatement of what ails the Middle East. Amiram Goldin was, apparently, a military man who retired and took his familty to Galilee because he thought it was the Tuscany or Provence of Israel. It didn't turn out that way. "We were sitting on a barrel of gunpowder" that was about to explode betwen Arabs and Jews, he says, so he got involved with the peace movement. Then his son was killed. How it fails to embitter him is never explored very deeply here. In addition, there are many unanswered questions -- Omri's 53-year-old mother Tilda, for instance, becomes pregnant within months after her son 's death. There are also several sequences featuring Lucy's Pussy. The band's unremarkable music punctuates the proceedings with incongruous results: Trope's insistence on showing Omri's parents' game but bewildered response to the music adds an unintended pathos.

Men On The Edge - A Fishermen's Diary (Gvarim Al Hakatze-Yoman Dayagim)

TITLE: Men On The Edge - A Fishermen's Diary (Gvarim Al Hakatze-Yoman Dayagim)
YEAR: 2005
DIR/PROD: Avner Faingulernt & Macabit Abramzon
COUNTRY: Israel
LANGUAGE: Hebrew and Arabic with English subtitles
TIME: 90 minutes
SOURCE:
TEXT: A gripping observation of the lives of Palestinian and Israeli fishermen working and living together on an abandoned Mediterranean shoreline between Israel and Gaza. Over the course of four years, the filmmakers depict the complex dynamics of hardworking men, driven together by necessity, creating partnerships in a place where their respective communities are in a constant state of conflict. Through the camera's attentive presence in their makeshift huts, we gain unique access into the inner worlds of middle-aged men, struggling with the forces of nature, as well as with the harshness of the national conflict that dictates their lives and the vicissitudes of their personal relationships. Away from the familiar scenes of the Intifada, the suicide attacks and the dramatic visuals, Men on the Edge, is a poetic documentary that invites us to reflect on the realities of the Middle East and far beyond.

Metallic Blues

TITLE: Metallic Blues
YEAR: 2004
DIR/PROD: Danny Verete
COUNTRY: Israel/Canada/Germany
LANGUAGE: English, Hebrew and German with English subtitles
TIME: 90 minutes
SOURCE:
TEXT: When Shmuel and Siso, stumble on the chance to buy a spotless blue 1985 Lincoln Continental limousine for ,000, they figure their luck has finally turned. All they need to do is ship the classic beauty to Germany, sell it to a collector and return with a handsome profit. So begins this offbeat, funny and touching buddy movie that brings together the irrepressible Avi Kushner (a noted Israeli stand-up comic) and Moshe Ivgy on a road trip from hell. Siso, a Moroccan Jew, is suspicious of the scheme and queasy about travelling to the land of the Holocaust. His friend is the son of Holocaust survivors, who long ago turned the page on that area of history until their adventures bring up unexpected emotions about the Jewish past in Germany. Winner - Israeli Film Academy Award.

My Sister My Bride

TITLE: My Sister My Bride
YEAR: 2004
DIR/PROD: Bonnie Burt
COUNTRY: USA
LANGUAGE: English
TIME: 26 minutes
SOURCE:
TEXT: A moving journey with two women in love, J. Farrell Cafferata and Caren Jenkins, who want to celebrate their commitment officially, like other couples.

PIGEON

TITLE: PIGEON
YEAR: 2004
DIR/PROD: Anthony Green
COUNTRY: Canada
LANGUAGE: English
TIME: 11 minutes
SOURCE:
TEXT: Based on a true story during WW II, Pigeon recounts a rare and startling act of kindness and courage.

MAGIC(S)

TITLE: MAGIC(S)
YEAR: 2005
DIR/PROD: Todd Felderstein
COUNTRY: USA
LANGUAGE: English and Hebrew and Arabic and Bulgarian and other with English ST
TIME: 94 minutes
SOURCE: MagicsDocumentary.com
TEXT: MAGIC(S) follows the journey of a smile as delivered by a "smile activist", a medical magician, as he travels from one pediatric hospital to another in the country of Israel where he works with both Palestinians and Israelis as they speak freely on the joys of receiving Magic Michael's remarkable gifts while candidly detailing the current intifada from an insider's perspective which continues to plague the conflicted borders of the land.. MAGIC(S) is the story of a "smile activist", a very unique entertainer in a very exceptional land who travels from one pediatric hospital to the next delivering healthy doses of happiness to all those in need of the most potent medicinal treatment know to mankind: laughter.
Equipped with the charm of your favorite uncle and the prowess of a seasoned entertainer MAGIC MICHAEL'S daily routine becomes the backbone of this documentary as it chronicles his delivery of healthy doses of humor throughout this tiny, multi-cultural country. His responsibility is simple in concept yet enormous in scope and that is to conjure a grin from those children inflicted by disease, injury and all too often, terror in an effort to speed and assist in their rehabilitation or to simply make their unfortunate circumstance that much more tolerable. Narrated, for the most part, by one of his now six children, MAGIC(S) details this act as accomplished day after day by this very unique magical performer. Stronger than disease, more potent than terror, MAGIC(S) returns to the very essence that binds human beings together regardless of ancestry, that being the need for humor and love. MAGIC(S) follows Michael on his daily routine from his home in Rehovot to three different hospitals: Dana Hospital in Tel Aviv, Alyn Hospital in Jerusalem and The Edmond and Lily Safra Hospital in Tel Hashomare. In each case there is a mutual eagerness. The magician combs the halls of these hospitals toting his wares in a violin case as his multi-aged, multi-cultural fans chant "Magic Michael, Magic Michael" from all corners of the ward. Children rush down hallways eager to smother him with their affections. Doctors, nurses, aids and parents consistently praise the genius of their magician's abilities and his relationships with the young patients. Palestinian parents gloat over Michael's smile-conjuring with the same enthusiasm as their Israeli counterparts. What he brings to these hospitals is immeasurable and each administration savors his discovery as their own. The fact that he is a religious Jew, a man whose traditional garb distinctly conveys his convictions, has no bearing whatsoever on his multi-ethnic audience. Women in burkas are as anxious for Michael to treat their children as their religious Jewish counterparts. As a therapeutic talent, Michael's responsibilities range from laughter to love as dispensed through wit, wisdom and his magical flair. His rehabilitative performances encourage the young patients to use what has since been repaired or not. At other times it is his friendship and will that affect the kids in immeasurable ways by gauges and graphs.
Departing the hospitals, Magic Michael then transforms into Meir (Michael) Tulkoff, husband and father of five. MAGIC(S) further investigates the smile in both his family and daily life.
The Director - His most recent credit is as a writer in the inaugural season of Sony/Marvel/MTV's SPIDER-MAN. He has written, directed and produced in the independent film arena most recently taking the Silver Remi at Worldfest Houston and honors at the EarthVision 2003 for a cutting environmental PSA aimed at the recklessness of the timber industry. His very first film, GESUNDHEIT, premiered at the inaugural year of the Temecula International Film Festival. He has directed a series of "documentary-ettes", abbreviated tributes, honoring The Barbra Streisand Foundation, Ed Begley, Jr., the late Frank G. Wells, the late Timothy Treadwell among many others.

Ydessa, The Bears and etc.

TITLE: Ydessa, The Bears and etc.
YEAR: 2004
DIR/PROD: Agnčs Varda
COUNTRY:
LANGUAGE: English and French w/ English ST
TIME: 44 minutes in 35mm
SOURCE:
TEXT: The Director saw the Partners (Teddy Bear Project) exhibit in Munich at the Haus de Kunst museum where the Nazis' 1937 Degenerate Art exhibition was held. She was so struck by the exhibit, which featured several thousand old photographs of people with teddy bears, that she flew to Toronto to meet its curator, Ydessa Hendeles. The director talks to Ydessa and to viewers, sharing their evolving reactions - curiosity, nostalgia, and finally shock - just as Ydessa intended. BOSTON JEWISH FILM FESTIVAL, NOVEMBER 2005

Only Human

TITLE: Only Human
YEAR: 2004
DIR/PROD: Dominic Harari and Teresa Pelegri
COUNTRY: Argentina/Spain
LANGUAGE: Spanish w/ English ST
TIME: 89 minutes in 35mm
SOURCE: Jeff Reichert Magnolia Pictures 49 West 27th Street, 7th Floor New York, NY 10001 Phone: 212-924-6701 Fax: 212-924-6742 JReichert@magpictures.com www.magpictures.com
TEXT: Leni Dalinsky brings her Palestinian fiancé Rafi home to meet her hyperactive Jewish family, and a Meet the Parents-type comedy of errors ensues. Assuming that Rafi is an Israeli Jew, Leni's newly Orthodox brother, belly dancing sister, and even her blind, rifle-toting Zionist grandfather all embrace him to their bosom. The always-marvelous Norma Aleandro (Son of the Bride) plays Leni's mother. BJFF.com

39 Pounds of Love

TITLE: 39 Pounds of Love
YEAR: 2005
DIR/PROD: Dani Menkin
COUNTRY: Israel
LANGUAGE: English and Hebrew w/ English ST
TIME: 70 minutes, video
SOURCE: Theatrical Bookings Greg Kendall Balcony Releasing Phone: 413-256-1349 greg@balconyfilm.com
TEXT: As a child, Israeli animator Ami Ankilewitz was diagnosed with a rare form of muscular dystrophy and given six years to live. Now 34 years old and weighing only 39 pounds, Ami sets out with his friends on a road trip across the United States with two goals: finding the doctor who first diagnosed him and riding a Harley-Davidson. Though his movement is now limited to a single finger on his left hand, Ami creates the cartoon characters which grace this moving, funny, and utterly surprising film. Seen at BJFF.ORG, November 2005

Security Groove

TITLE: Security Groove
YEAR: 2002
DIR/PROD: Edan Alterman
COUNTRY: Israel
LANGUAGE: Hebrew w/ English ST
TIME: 3 minutes, video
SOURCE: Arik Bernstein Alma Films Ltd. 4 Herman Cohen St. Tel Aviv 64385 Israel Phone: 972-3-5224061 Fax: 972-3-52248 6 arik@alma-films.com
TEXT: The dramatic increase in the number of security guards since the start of the Intifada inspired Edan Alterman to make this short film about the latest Israeli urban soundtrack. Seen at BJFF.ORG, November 2005

Short

TITLE: Short
YEAR: 2005
DIR/PROD: Edan Alterman
COUNTRY: Israel
LANGUAGE: Hebrew/English w/subtitles
TIME: 51 minutes
SOURCE: Arik Bernstein Alma Films Ltd. 4 Herman Cohen St. Tel Aviv 64385 Israel Phone: 972-3-5224061 Fax: 972-3-52248 6 arik@alma-films.com
TEXT: Like Rodney Dangerfield, short people get no respect. The 5-foot-4-inch tall Israeli comedian and television star Edan Alterman explores what it means to be short through personal revelation, interviews with well-known Israelis, and conversations with teenage boys. His documentary is as charming and sensitive as it is funny and candid. Seen at BJFF.ORG, November 2005

Age of Reason

TITLE: Age of Reason
YEAR: 2004
DIR/PROD: Myriam Aziza
COUNTRY: France
LANGUAGE: French w/subtitles
TIME: 14 minutes
SOURCE: Romain Pascual 17 Production 35, Rue Mouffetard Paris, 75005 France Phone: 33-1-46272317 17prod@free.fr
TEXT: Brought up to obey and honor Jewish laws and traditions, seven-year-old Deborah begins to ask, "Why?" Seen at BJFF.ORG, November 2005

The Loser Who Won

TITLE: The Loser Who Won
YEAR: 2005
DIR/PROD: Jack Feldstein
COUNTRY: Australia
LANGUAGE: English
TIME: 20 minutes
SOURCE: Jack Feldstein Jack Feldstein Films 40A Birriga Rd. Bellevue Hill Sydney, NSW 2023 Australia Phone: 612-93652926 feldsteinjack@yahoo.com.au
TEXT: In this winningly funny and inventive animated short fiction, a 90-year-old Jewish pensioner helps an unlucky actuary find true love. Seen at BJFF.ORG, November 2005

Checking Out

TITLE: Checking Out
YEAR: 2004
DIR/PROD: Jeff Hare
COUNTRY: USA
LANGUAGE: English
TIME: 94 minutes
SOURCE: Mark Lane Fully Attired Film Group, LLC 17420 Lahey St. Granada Hills, CA 91344 Phone: 818-624-2035 Fax: 818-831-5840 checkingoutlp@yahoo.com
TEXT: This snappy, heartwarming comedy stars Peter Falk as Morris Applebaum, an irascible old Shakespearean actor who summons his children, played by Laura San Giacomo, David Paymer, and Judge Reinhold, to announce his plans to bring the final curtain down on himself while there's still time to make a good exit. Seen at BJFF.ORG, November 2005

Adam and Steve

TITLE: Adam and Steve
YEAR: 2005
DIR/PROD: Craig Chester
COUNTRY: USA
LANGUAGE: English
TIME: 100 minutes - Video
SOURCE: Johnny Ortez Funny Boy Films 346 N Detroit St. Los Angeles, CA 90036-2531 Phone: 323-993-0000 Fax: 323-954-0440 johnny@funnyboyfilms.com
TEXT: New York, 1987: Jewish Goth Adam (Craig Chester) and big-haired Dazzle Dancer Steve (Malcolm Gets) share a disastrous one-night-stand. Seventeen years later, the two meet again and fall in love, with neither one recognizing the other. Irreverent, at times raunchy, this hilarious debut film features stand-out supporting performances from Parker Posey and Chris Kattan. Seen at BJFF.ORG, November 2005

Local Call

TITLE: Local Call
YEAR: 2004
DIR/PROD: Arthur Joffe
COUNTRY: France
LANGUAGE: French w/subtitles
TIME: 102 minutes
SOURCE: Lise Zipci Les Films du Losange 22, avenue Pierre-1er-de-Serbie Paris 75116 France Phone: 33-1-44438710 Fax: 33-1-49520640 L.Zipci@FilmsduLosange.fr www.filmsdulosange.fr
TEXT: A supernatural Jewish cell phone comedy? Yes, and it's just delightful. The marvelous Sergio Castellitto (Unfair Competition) stars as Felix Mandel, a sweet Parisian astronomer who, to placate his wife, gets rid of his father's old cashmere overcoat. Once he gives it away, he receives a collect call from his angry father. The rub: His father has been dead for two years! Seen at BJFF.ORG, November 2005

The Ritchie Boys

TITLE: The Ritchie Boys
YEAR: 2004
DIR/PROD: Christian Bauer
COUNTRY: USA/Germany/Italy
LANGUAGE: English
TIME: 90 minutes, 35mm
SOURCE: Christian Bauer TANGRAM Herzog- Wilhelm - Strasse 27 80331 Munich, Germany Phone: 49-89-236606-0 info@tangramfilm.de www.ritchieboys.com
TEXT: At top-secret U.S. Camp Ritchie in Maryland, the army trained an elite band of young Jewish refugees from Nazi Germany in intelligence work. Amazingly, they returned to Germany, intent on breaking the enemy's morale. They called themselves the Ritchie Boys. This remarkable documentary uses never-before-seen archival footage and first-person accounts by two of the film's heroes to tell their unforgettable story. Seen at BJFF.ORG, and Washington DC JFF too in November 2005

The Man Who Loved Haugesund

TITLE: The Man Who Loved Haugesund
YEAR: 2002
DIR/PROD: John Haukeland and Tore Vollan
COUNTRY: Norway
LANGUAGE: Norwegian w/ English ST
TIME: 52 minutes
SOURCE: Toril Siomnsen Norwegian Filminstitute Dronningensgt 16 PO Box 482 Sentrum, N-0105 Oslo Norway Phone: 47-22-474500 Fax: 47-22-474597 toril.simonsen@nfi.no ts@nfi.no
TEXT: Moritz Rabinowitz, the only Jew in Haugesund in 1911, built a clothing empire that at one time employed 3,000 people. Nonetheless he remained an outsider. An anti-Nazi activist in World War II, when Germany occupied Norway, Rabinowitz became a hunted man. This fascinating but chilling documentary becomes a portrait of small-town anti-Semitism. Seen at BJFF.ORG, November 2005

Awake Zion

TITLE: Awake Zion
YEAR: 2004
DIR/PROD: Monica Haim
COUNTRY: USA
LANGUAGE: English
TIME: 60 minutes
SOURCE: Monica Haim Twin Goat Productions 54 Havemeyer St. #2 Brooklyn, NY 11211 Phone: 646-263-5115 monica@awakezion.net www.awakezion.net
TEXT: Reggae enthusiast and director Monica Haim explores similarities between Judaism and reggae culture: the Star of David and the ancient African six-pointed star, Hasidic earlocks and dreadlocks, old Jewish songs that fit into African grooves. Could they be connected? The film celebrates music and its capacity to unite people of all faiths. Featuring reggae artists King Django, Super Dane, and Matisyahu. Seen at BJFF.ORG, November 2005

Poumy

TITLE: Poumy
YEAR: 2004
DIR/PROD: Sam Ball
COUNTRY: USA
LANGUAGE: French w/subtitles
TIME: 30 minutes video
SOURCE: Phone: 415-206-1880 Fax: 415-206-1329 admin@citizenfilm.org www.citizenfilm.org
TEXT: The eloquent, witty 92-year-old Andree "Poumy" Moreuil reflects on her experiences as a young Jewish mother who escaped the Nazis with her two sons and joined the French Resistance. The stunning documentary by San Francisco filmmaker Sam Ball (Pleasures of Urban Decay) is a hauntingly poetic landscape that conveys the intensity and mysterious exhilaration of her wartime years. Seen at BJFF.ORG, November 2005

Helen Suzman, An Indomitable Woman

TITLE: Helen Suzman, An Indomitable Woman
YEAR: 2005
DIR/PROD: Ingrid Gavshon
COUNTRY: South Africa
LANGUAGE: English
TIME: 14 minutes
SOURCE: Ingrid Gavshon Angel Films Atlas Studios 33 Frost Ave Auckland Park Johannesburg, 2092 South Africa Phone: 27-11-7267819 Fax: 27-11-7268521 angelfilms1@tiscal.co.za
TEXT: A fascinating documentary portrait of Helen Suzman in her own acerbic and witty words. The daughter of Russian Jews who immigrated to South Africa, Helen Suzman was a fierce liberal voice and an opposition politician in the darkest days of apartheid, and she served in the South African parliament for thirty-five years. Seen at BJFF.ORG, November 2005

Love One Another

TITLE: Love One Another
YEAR: 1922
DIR/PROD: Carl Dreyer
COUNTRY: Germany
LANGUAGE: SILENT
TIME: 84 minutes in 35mm
SOURCE: Dominique Kaspar Deutshes Filminstitut - DIF Kreuzberger Ring 56 65205 Wiesbaden Germany Phone: 49-611-970-0010 Fax: 49-611-970-0015 filmverleih@deutsches-filminstitut.de
TEXT: Long-lost silent film by the great Danish director Carl Dreyer. A young Jewish girl moves to St. Petersburg, falls in love with a revolutionary, flees the czar/s police, and returns to her village just as a pogrom breaks out. Seen at BJFF.ORG, November 2005

Esther's Book

TITLE: Esther's Book
YEAR: 2004
DIR/PROD: Esaias Baitel
COUNTRY: Sweden
LANGUAGE: English Narration
TIME: 15 minutes, 35mm
SOURCE: Sara Yamashita Ruster Swedish Film Institute Box 27126 Stockholm, 102 52 Sweden Phone: 46-8-6651141 Fax: 46-8-6663698 sara.ruster@sfi.se
TEXT: For fifteen years Swedish artist Esaias Baitel photographed Purim holiday festivities in Jerusalem. Seen at BJFF.ORG, November 2005

Homing

TITLE: Homing
YEAR: 2005
DIR/PROD: Jonah Bleicher
COUNTRY: Israel/USA
LANGUAGE: Arabic w. English ST
TIME: 9 minutes
SOURCE: Jonah Bleicher Zeney R Jones Productions 1626 E. 22nd St Phone: 415-350-8385 jonah@zeneyrjones.com www.zeneyrjones.com
TEXT: His bus is late. While he waits, step inside the head of a suicide bomber. Seen at BJFF.ORG, November 2005

The Diaries of Yossef Nachmani

TITLE: The Diaries of Yossef Nachmani
YEAR: 2005
DIR/PROD: Dalia Karpel
COUNTRY: Israel
LANGUAGE: Hebrew/Arabic w/subtitles
TIME: 60 minutes
SOURCE: Transfax Film Productions 22 Nachmani Street Tel Aviv 65201 Israel Phone: 972-3566-1484 transfax@netvision.net.il www.transfax.co.il
TEXT: This Israeli documentary explores the life and work of Yossef Nachmani, a former director of the Jewish National Fund office in the Galilee. Nachmani left behind a fascinating series of diaries that shed new light upon the author's complex personality and upon the events in the Galilee during the 30s and 40s, when he was acquiring as much land as possible in support of the Zionist enterprise. Seen at BJFF.ORG, November 2005

HINEINI: Coming Out in a Jewish High School

TITLE: HINEINI: Coming Out in a Jewish High School
YEAR: 2005
DIR/PROD: Irena Fayngold
COUNTRY: USA
LANGUAGE: English
TIME: 60 minutes
SOURCE: Idit Klein Keshet 284 Amory St. Jamaica Plain, MA 02130 Phone: 617-524-9227 Fax: 617-524-9229 idit@boston-keshet.org www.boston-keshet.org
TEXT: This timely film chronicles Shulamit Izen's fight to start a gay-straight alliance at Gann Academy - the New Jewish High School of Greater Boston. Beyond the struggle to create a supportive environment for gay and lesbian students and teachers at the school, this is the story of a community wrestling with the very definition of pluralism and diversity in a Jewish context. Seen at BJFF.ORG, November 2005

A Treasure In Auschwitz

TITLE: A treasure in auschwitz
YEAR: 2005
DIR/PROD: Yahaly Gat
COUNTRY: Israel
LANGUAGE: Hebrew w/ English Subtitles
TIME: 55 minutes
SOURCE: Yahaly Gat Email: fg_prod@netvision.net.il MUSE PRODUCTIONS
TEXT: Documentary: A young student, Yariv Nornberg, hears from an elderly vendor in a rundown shop a fantastic story about a Jewish treasure buried in Polish soil. His curiosity is aroused when he learns of the location of the hiding place - next to the infamous Auschwitz extermination camp. During the next 5 years, Yariv pursues these lost religious artifacts, hidden in the grounds of the Great Synagogue in the city of Oswiecim (Auschwitz) in 1939. For him, these artifacts embody his own perished family and guide his attempt for a closure and acceptance of the Polish people, usually regarded by Jews as collaborators and anti-Semites. Yariv manages to organize a unique archaeological excavation to unearth the treasure. But as the digging progresses, it becomes apparent that the synagogue's soil conceals a 60-year-old sinister secret and Yariv and his crew begin to lose hope. Until one morning a shovel hits a metallic object in one of the ditches....
The search and excavation for the treasure translates within the film to a succession of poignant metaphors - to the Jewish existence in Poland and its annihilation, to the possibility of a dialog between the younger generations, to the capacity of Nazi evilness embodied in the presence of the nearby death camp and above all - to the growing sentiment that only 60 years have gone by and already WW2 and it's greatest nightmare - the Holocaust - is tragically transforming into an archaeological exhibit...
NY Jewish FF (Jan 2006)
About the Director: Director Producer, writer and director of documentaries and image films. Head of Muse productions Ltd. BFA graduate, Film and Television studies, Tel Aviv University [1984]. Member of the Producers Union & the Documentary Forum, Israel. Recent films (as producer): *As a River Flows (doc, 67 min.,2005) *Living in Boxes (doc, 54 min. , 2004) Jerusalem Film Festival 2004; Globians, Potsdam 2005 *Men on Wheels (doc, 54 min., 2003)Superfest 2003 (Merit Award); IVfest, Kerala 2003; Tucson Jewish FF 2004;Hartford Jewish FF; Detroit Jewish FF *Body Exposures(doc, 45 min. 2003) for the National Geographic Channel *Love Inventory (doc, 90 min. 2001)Best Doc - Jerusalem Film Festival & Film Academy 2001; Berlin Film Festival 2001; Seattle FF; Bangkok; Taiwan Doc (Second Prize); Boston FF; INPUT, and many others

As a great River Flows

TITLE: As a great River Flows
YEAR: 2005
DIR/PROD: Yitzhak Halutzi
COUNTRY: Israel
LANGUAGE: Hebrew with English Subtitles
TIME: 67 minutes
SOURCE: Yahaly Gat Email: fg_prod@netvision.net.il MUSE PRODUCTIONS
TEXT: Documentary: Nir Malchi is a world leading Tai-Chi master, born on a Kibbutz but turned to Judaism to become an ultra-orthodox Jew. He was also a renowned commando fighter and is now fighting his own battle with cancer. It's been two years since his doctor declared he has a few months to live. Nir was grown up to be an individualist, a rebel. During his army service as a commando fighter he became a role model to many after saving some of his diving partners' lives. After discharging from the army he traveled to Japan to learn the eastern martial arts in order to fulfill his quest for spiritual strength. He trained for 10 years with the best eastern masters and during that time began his return to Judaism followed by a large group of Israelis looking for spiritual guidance. After returning to Israel with his wife he established the largest Tai-Chi school in Israel. As the film progresses Nir's relationship with his first-born son, Gal, is revealed. 28-year-old Gal was the fruit of an affair Nir has carried out while in the army. He met his son only once or twice and the young child learnt of his father's fame from newspaper clippings. After the army Gal himself began training in martial arts and their ways crossed again. This touching union is the emotional center of the film as Nir's health deteriorates and improves periodically. Nir's complex personality breaks our conventional ways of thinking about what an Israeli is or should be. His fight for a cure to his ailment forces the viewer to rethink the traditional definitions of Eastern and Western medicine practices and philosophies. About the Director: Selected Filmography: 2000 -present: - Director: "As a Great River Flows", 67 min. documentary (for Israel channel 2) Director for the Israeli Educational TV, TV programs & Documentaries (including 2005 academy Award nomination for Best Children's Show - "Hanni's Room") - Director: "One of the righteous 36" - documentary 50 min. (for the Israeli TV) 1990-2000 - Director of numerous TV series, among them: "Redhead" (winner best dramatic series for children, Bulgaria 1996; First Prize, 32nd Intl. Festival, Chicago). "Reading", highly popular dramatic 30 episode series (Israeli Educational TV). - "Braids", Script & Direction of feature film, (screened at the Jerusalem Film Festival 1990; New York Jewish Festival and many others). 1988 - "Sesame Street" - Director of 50 episodes. 1976-2004 - Senior Director at the Israeli educational TV. 1970 - present - involved in many theatre productions as actor and director; teacher of TV direction and acting in various schools and colleges.

Diameter of the Bomb

TITLE: Diameter of the Bomb
YEAR: 2005
DIR/PROD: Steven Silver, Andrew Quigley
COUNTRY: UK / Canada
LANGUAGE: English Hebrew and Arabic and ST
TIME: 86 minutes
SOURCE: In the USA: http://www.thinkfilmcompany.com/ Elsewhere: Rainmaker FIlms/National Film Board of Canada
TEXT: Lives linked in tragedy reverberate in an unsparing examination of a 2002 suicide bombing aboard a Jerusalem bus. Nineteen people died in the attack and this unflinchingly clinical account of the incident and its aftermath follows the bomb's trajectory in human suffering. The film relies on footage from the scene, interviews with Israeli forensic experts, emergency workers, trauma doctors, police and military officials, and the terrorist's accomplice, as well as the bomber's own home video, to reconstruct events. But at the documentary's core are the stories of five deaths: an adolescent dancer preparing for a trip to Germany, only identified by the tattered pieces of her swimsuit; the young wife of a stone carver, who now must etch his epitaph on a headstone; a teen-aged girl whose family fled the hardships of Ethiopia; the only son of an elderly Israeli Arab worker; and the bomber himself, an educated Palestinian who spoke of getting his doctorate. They're remembered by their families and friends struggling with loss and with the impact of the continuing conflict between Israelis and Palestinians. seen at Hamptonsfilmfest.org Seen at TIFF also

Lucky

TITLE: Lucky
YEAR: 2005
DIR/PROD: Melissa Berman / Sondra Wiemar
COUNTRY: USA
LANGUAGE: English
TIME: 10 minutes
SOURCE: www.Uglybetty.com
TEXT: In a Palm Beach Florida condominium community, Ruth and Harry spend their time doing romantic things like going to the podiatrist, playing bridge and having dinner at the early bird special. All is bliss until one day Harry brings home the wrong tuna.

DAVID AND LAYLA

TITLE: DAVID AND LAYLA
YEAR: 2005
DIR/PROD: Jay Jonroy
COUNTRY: USA
LANGUAGE: English and Hebrew and Kurdish with English Subtitles
TIME: 109 minutes
SOURCE: Jalal Jay Jonroy, writer/director: T 212 757 4743 F 1 212 757 4743 Email: jj@newrozfilms.com
TEXT: Cast: Shiva Rose (Layla), David Moscow (David Fine), Polly Adams (Judith), Callie Thorne (Abby), Will Janowitz (Woody Fine), Alexander Blaise (Francois), Ed Chemaly (Uncle 'Al' Ali), Anna George (Zina), Peter van Wagner A real New York story, DAVID & LAYLA is a film about an impossible romance that gets at the heart of the hypocritical stereotypes and illusions we all have about differing cultures and religions. David (David Moscow), a young Jewish man finds Layla (Shiva Rose McDermott), a beautiful Muslim immigrant, and can't get her off of his mind. But her Kurdish culture doesn't mix with his Upper East Side origins, and both lovers can't help but mislead their families about one another as they try to begin their affair. However, marriage is quickly on their minds with Layla's deportation looming and they must work out their differences or lose each other forever. A true comedy of errors ensues from temple to mosque, from perversion to conversion, and all the while their passions increase regardless of their unlikely attraction.
Jay wrote: In New York, it's love at first sight when hip TV producer David first lays eyes on voluptuous Layla - a mysterious, sensual dancer. Layla turns out to be a Muslim refugee. Advised by his ironic French cameraman, David's attempts to woo Layla eventually succeed. But his family is dead against it, as is hers! Layla is faced with deportation. She must choose: Muslim Dr. Ahmad or Jewish David? Meanwhile, David's TV show playfully explores the correlation between sex, spice, joie de vivre, and politics! In the face of his parents, will David dump Abby, his Jewish princess fiancée? Will David and Layla follow their hearts to blast through centuries of religious animosity and war? Who will convert? Will David & Layla's passion for life (and spice!) bring a reign of dance, laughter, and peace to their folks?

Elusive Peace: Israel and the Arabs

TITLE: Elusive Peace: Israel and the Arabs
YEAR: 2005
DIR/PROD: Norma Percy
COUNTRY: UK
LANGUAGE: English
TIME: minutes
SOURCE: BBC
TEXT: This program employs extraordinary access on all sides to tell the story of the unraveling peace process and ensuing violence between Israelis and Palestinians from 1999 through this year. ELUSIVE PEACE includes interviews with insiders from Ariel Sharon and Yasser Arafat to Bill Clinton and Colin Powell, behind-the-scenes footage of tense peace negotiations, and snapshots of the violence that enveloped the region much of the past five years. Shown in the USA on PBS, October 10, 2005. IN the UK it is a new three part documentary series examines the last six years of the Arab-Israeli peace process from the point of view of presidents and prime ministers, their generals and ministers and those behind the suicide bombs and assassinations. The series reveals what happened behind closed doors as the peace process failed and the violence of the intifada exploded. Programme 1: CLINTON (1999/2000) Israel's former Prime Minister Ehud Barak persuaded US President Bill Clinton to devote his last 18 months in office to helping make peace with Yasser Arafat. But after tense negotiations the deal was never made. Then Ariel Sharon made a controversial visit to the al-Aqsa mosque compound in East Jerusalem, a site which is also holy to Jews. Programme 2: ARAFAT (2001/2002) The former US Secretary of State, Colin Powell attempted to make peace between Israel and the Palestinians. However, his efforts were derailed by his own hard-line colleagues. And the Palestinian leader, Yasser Arafat himself. Programme 3: SHARON (2003-2005) President Bush was determined to stay out of Middle East peace-making. But the war in Iraq forced him to court Arab allies. He needed to push Israel's Prime Minister Ariel Sharon back towards peace. But Ariel Sharon moved the goal posts.
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/programmes/elusive_peace/4311136.stm

Belzec

TITLE: Belzec
YEAR: 2005
DIR/PROD: Guillaume Moscovitz
COUNTRY: France
LANGUAGE: Polish French Hebrew w/ English Subtitles
TIME: 112 minutes
SOURCE: Films Distribution, Paris (a vlr production) www.advitamdistribution.com
TEXT: A documentary on Belzec, the death camp that was open for less than a year, but killed over 600,000. In 60 days, 330,000 Jews were murdered in 1942. As the Soviets advanced, the Nazis closed the camp and wiped out nearly all traces of it. They planted tress over the mass graves, and one would never know what really exists under the soil. Guillaume Moscovitz's first feature film reconstructs the horror through the memories of the inhabitants of the village, who watched on helplessly, as virtual accomplices, as the massacre was carried out. The imagery emerges slowly from the emptiness in this moving and brutal documentary on the repression of the conscience. Belzec is a film on a forgotten death camp. The destruction of the History with Belzec is the consequence of obliteration wanted, organized, programmed traces of the extermination of the Jews of Europe by the Nazis. By filming the after-effects of this obliteration, Belzec is a film on the violence of our present. Where there is only destruction, how to attest what was? The only survivors of Belzec were the Jews forced to herd other Jews to their deaths. The only living survivor appears in the film. She was 7 years old, and was hidden in the village. Seen at Venice Film Festival 2005. Also NY Jewish Film Festival January 2006
Presque oublié dans l'histoire de la Shoah, Belzec est chronologiquement le premier camp d'extermination de l'Aktion Reinhard, le plan nazi d'extermination des Juifs des territoires de la Pologne occupée. Sa destruction intégrale dans les premiers mois de l'année 1943, presque un an avant le démantčlement des camps de Sobibor et de Treblinka, témoigne de la volonté nazie d'effacer les traces de l'extermination des juifs d'Europe. Le meurtre de masse industrialisé du peuple juif par les Nazis ne s'est pas arręté aux meurtres des vies, il a continué avec la destruction des cadavres de ceux qui avaient été exterminés : effacement des corps, des noms et des lieux. Ce qu'on appelle aujourd'hui le négationnisme était déjŕ au principe męme du meurtre nazi : l'effacement des traces de l'extermination faisait partie du plan d'anéantissement du peuple juif. A part Rudolf Reder décédé ŕ la fin des années soixante et Chaďm Hirszmann mort assassiné ŕ Lublin au lendemain de la guerre, personne n'est revenu du camp d'extermination de Belzec pour témoigner. En filmant les séquelles de cet effacement, le cinéaste montre la violence de notre présent : lŕ oů il n'y a que destruction, comment attester de ce qui a été ?

HABER

TITLE: HABER
YEAR: 2006
DIR/PROD: Daniel Ragussis
COUNTRY: USA
LANGUAGE: English
TIME: 40 minutes
SOURCE: www.haberfilm.ORG dan at haberfilm dot org
TEXT: A short film on Fritz Haber, the German Jewish chemist, who received the Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 1918 for his discovery of the synthesis of ammonia from its elements. Haber was the son of a prosperous chemical merchant. He entered his father's business but soon decided to turn to an academic career. His intensive early researches in electrochemistry and thermodynamics soon gained him the position of Professor of Physical Chemistry (1898) at the Technische Hochschule, Karlsruhe. His most important work which begun in 1904, was the synthesis of ammonia from hydrogen and nitrogen. His laboratory demonstration interested Bosch, Bergius and the Badische Aniline-and Sodafabrik companies, and they eventually developed the process into commercial production. Haber and Bosch were awarded the Nobel Prize in chemistry in 1918 "for the synthesis of ammonia from its elements". This work of Haber was invaluable for the German military effort in World War I. In 1911, at the age of 42, Haber was appointed Director of the Kaiser Wilhelm Institute for Physical Chemistry in Berlin .With the outbreak of World War I. in 1914, motivated by his strong patriotism, he placed himself and his laboratory at the service of the government. He played a leading part in the development of poison gas as a weapon. His wife, a chemist also, killed herself due to this invention. Haber fled the nazi regime, and his relatives were killed using poison gas that he helped to develop. By the way... The nucleus of the libraries of the Weizmann Institute in Israel was the private collection of the late Prof. Fritz Haber.

My Land Zion

TITLE: My Land Zion
YEAR: 2005
DIR/PROD: Yulie Cohen Gerstel
COUNTRY: Israel
LANGUAGE: Hebrew w/ English Subtitles
TIME: 54 minutes
SOURCE: Women Make Movies Debra Zimmermann dzimmerman@wmm.com
TEXT: Are we destined to spend generation after generation living at the expense of others? Is land more important than life? What kind of mother raises her children in a country where they might get blown up riding on a school bus? Sixth-generation Israeli Yulie Cohen Gerstel poses difficult questions without simple answers in this highly personal odyssey to understand the burden of her country's history. In seeking the links that connect the Holocaust, the creation of the Jewish state and the displacement of Palestinians, she journeys across generations, from the rubble of an abandoned Arab house to the former home of a Holocaust survivor and to a Jewish settlement in Hebron to talk with a woman whose husband was killed by a militant Palestinian. In wondering what kind of future awaits her daughters now just a few years away from military service, she confronts the events, sacrifices and myths that have shaped her country and her own fears that history does indeed repeat itself.

NASSER

TITLE: Nasser
YEAR: 2005
DIR/PROD: Adam Yeremian
COUNTRY: USA
LANGUAGE: English
TIME: 20 minutes
SOURCE: NYU
TEXT: In 2001, Yasser Arafat's top political advisor sent his eldest son to the United States for a better life. This documentary follows a month in the life of a Palestinian-American who strives to be successful in his new homeland. Placed on anti-depressants because of overwhelming stress, this self-supporting youth is caught in a life-altering juggling between school, work, fear of failure, and loss of identity.

PRIME

TITLE: PRIME
YEAR: 2005
DIR/PROD: Ben Younger
COUNTRY: USA
LANGUAGE: English
TIME: 103 minutes
SOURCE: Stratus Films
TEXT: Cast: Meryl Streep, Uma Thurman, Bryan Greenberg, Jon Abrahams Prime is a sophisticated character comedy about Rafi (Uma Thurman), a recently divorced 37-year-old career woman from Manhattan, and what happens when Dave (Bryan Greenberg), a talented 23-year-old painter from Brooklyn, falls in love with her. Part counselor, part Jewish mother, Rafi's therapist Lisa (Streep) is gingerly helping Rafi out of her post-divorce slump and through the urgent alarm of her ticking biological clock. Although doubtful that Rafi's new fling (he is 23, after all) is an appropriate partner in the long term, Lisa encourages her patient to enjoy it and have fun (he is 23, after all!). But once Lisa accidentally discovers that Rafi's new boyfriend is, in fact, her son, Dave, she finds it increasingly difficult to act the good therapist while hearing intimate details of her son's love life. Soon, the secret is out and cultures clash, complications arise, civil arguments erupt and a storm of opinions swirl around the couple at the center of all this comic fuss. Prime looks at love from everyone's point of view-friends, relatives and in this case, Rafi's therapist-and follows all who come apart, and some who pull it together, when two people fall in love. Ben Younger (Boiler Room) directs and is produced by Jennifer Todd and Suzanne Todd under their Team Todd banner. The executive producers are Mark Gordon and Bob Yari. The film will be released domestically by Universal Pictures, with Focus Features handling all international sales.

The Naked Brothers Band

TITLE: The Naked Brothers Band
YEAR: 2005
DIR/PROD: Polly Draper
COUNTRY: USA
LANGUAGE: English
TIME: 85 minutes
SOURCE:
TEXT: Cast: Nat Wolff (Nat), Alex Wolff (Alex), Joshua Kaye (Josh), David Juilian Levi (David), David Julian Levi (David), Thomas Batuello (Thomas), Cole Hawkins (Cole), Allie DiMeco (Rosalina), Jesse Draper (Jesse), Michael Wolff (Dad), Cooper Pillot (Cooper), Jonathan Pillot (Mort Needleman). "The Naked Brothers Band" is a thoroughly entertaining rock and roll musical comedy for children and adults. Part documentary, part mockumentary, and a lot of fun in between, it tracks a kids' rock band that struggles with superstardom in elementary school. This 'fantasy rockumentary' stars two real life brothers; Nat Wolff age 9, and Alex Wolff age 6. All the songs in the film were written and performed by them. In "The Naked Brothers Band," the camera follows Nat and Alex through their concerts, their rehearsals and their private lives, as they deal with the growing pains related to love, friendship and fame. Film features original songs written and performed by Nat Wolff including, "Crazy Car," "Got No Mojo," "Hardcore Wrestlers," and "Rosalina," and a special solo performance by Alex Wolff singing his original song, "That's How It Is." "The Naked Brothers Band" is written and directed by Polly Draper (star of 30something), starring Nat Wolff and Alex Wolff. Music by Nat Wolff, produced by Michael Wolff and Michael Levine. Executive producers Tim Draper, Polly Draper and Michael Wolff.

The skies are closer in Homesh

TITLE: The skies are closer in Homesh
YEAR: 2004
DIR/PROD: Menora Hazani
COUNTRY: Israel
LANGUAGE: Hebrew w/ English Subtitles
TIME: 53 minutes
SOURCE: Ruth Diskin Films Tel: 972-2-5610094 ;972-2-5669691 Fax:972-2-5660718 ruthdis@netvision.net.il http://www.ruthfilms.com
TEXT: This documentary is an exploration of faith, in a situation of unfathomable complexity. Israeli filmmaker Menora Hazan tells a first-person story of her decision with new husband Ariel to settle in the secluded hilltop Jewish settlement of Homesh. Originally a secular community, settlers in Homesh sought religious families to join them after killings and hardship drove many of their number away. Just married, Ariel and Menora feel drawn to the mountaintop community, where the air is sweet and the view is beautiful; in spite of the pleas of their families, they follow in the wake of the other new settlers. This is an intimate portrait that shares Menora's experience of spreading roots in a harsh and unstable environment, her fears for herself and her family with violence so present, her ambivalence, envy of the enthusiasm of earlier Jewish settlers, and her growing solidarity with nearby settlers who are being forcibly removed from their homes by fellow Israelis. The effects of killings of neighbors and relatives is profound, and the Israelis in this film exhibit a determination to persist in their faith, and to pass on to their children this faith "to believe, even when you don't understand."

Torte Bluma

TITLE: Torte Bluma
YEAR: 2005
DIR/PROD: Benjamin Ross
COUNTRY: UK
LANGUAGE: English and German
TIME: 17 minutes
SOURCE: Email: dan@dmcfilmco.com
TEXT: Cast: Stellan Skarsgard (Good Will Hunting; Exorcist: The Beginning; Dogville; Breaking the Waves), Simon McBurney (Kafka; The Manchurian Candidate; Bright Young Things), Sol Frieder (Niagra; Niagra; IQ; Music Box; Midsummer Night's Sex Comedy; Love and Death), Benedick Bates (Woundings; Real Women; Deadly Advice) The fine line of human nature in its most compassionate, yet destructive evil is depicted through the complex relationship between a servile prisoner and a Commander of the Treblinka concentration camp, played by Stellan Skarsgĺrd. WINNER AT THE LA FEST

THE FOOL OF THE WORLD AND THE FLYING SHIP

TITLE: THE FOOL OF THE WORLD AND THE FLYING SHIP
YEAR: 2005
DIR/PROD:
COUNTRY:
LANGUAGE: English Subtitles
TIME: minutes
SOURCE: Amazon.com
TEXT: This delightful, magnificently animated Russian folktale tells the story of a peasant boy who wins the hand of a beautiful princess with a little help from his uniquely talented friends. Pyotr and his friends journey to the Czar's palace, where they successfully complete three impossible tasks and prove that the most humble of people can defeat power and greed. Parents' Choice Award. (60 min.)

Glow Ropes: The Rise and Fall of a Bar Mitzvah Emcee

TITLE: Glow Ropes: The Rise and Fall of a Bar Mitzvah Emcee
YEAR: 2005
DIR/PROD: George Valencia
COUNTRY: USA
LANGUAGE: English
TIME: 76 minutes
SOURCE: Hellfish Films, NJ hellfishfilms.com
TEXT: The writer, producer, director was a Bar Mitzvah entertainer for years. Now he has created a fun film based on the life of an emcee and his clients and co-workers. A satire. Stars Tom Pepper, George Valencia, and Judy Reyes (Scrubs). Taylor James is a goyish looking entertainer on the bar mitzvah circuit in NJ, when he is discovered and makes it to the big time: NYC bar mitzvah emcee'ing. Soon he becomes a star in NYC, teaching 13 year olds to dance, etc. But wait. His career is ruined when someone sabotages the glow rope bracelets. Then a Jewish bar mitzvah boy, a future Spielberg perhaps, tracks down a drunk Taylor to get his side of the story for a film. Premiered at the NY Latino Film Fest in July 2005.
Films at Margaret Mead
Wake Zion
Kings and Extras
Vault Key
Naomis Corset

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