Jewish Film Archive Online
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The Block

TITLE: The Block
YEAR: 1999
DIR/PROD: David Avivi / Sharon Shavit, Nisim Mosek
COUNTRY: Israel
LANGUAGE: Hebrew w/ English ST
TIME: 50
SOURCE: Blue Rose Productions, Jerusalem
TEXT: There is a new social reality in the Katamon neighborhood in Jerusalem. The third generation, which still feels underprivileged, has given up its aspirations of integration into Israeli society and is striving for an anti-Ashkenazi revolution. On Bar Yohai Street, Block 102, entrance A, live four families. Shlomi Bouskila on the second floor, a fresh, enthusiastic community activist, organizes a demonstration by the residents of the neighborhood. He works hard to convince his neighbors to dress up as ultra-orthodox and demonstrate opposite the office of ultra-orthodox Deputy Housing Minister. Above him lives Shlomo Wazana, a veteran activist supporter of the public housing law, artist and teacher at Bezalel. The Russian lady who lived on the ground floor moved for fear of the rats she felt walking over her at night, while Shlomit, the token Ashkenazi daughter of Holocaust survivors, has nothing good to say about her neighbors. Below her live the Aboutboul brothers. Their apartment is the local parliament for all those with time to kill and revolutionary ideas. The speaker of the parliament is charismatic Ezer Cohen, who wants to turn his apartment into a pirate radio station. Directly, with humor and unique aesthetics, the film touches one of the major current problems facing Israeli society. Years of establishment neglect have given the term "block" an immediate association with the sad social condition of its inhabitants. Filming was done during Memorial Day for the Fallen, Holocaust Memorial Day and Israel's 50th Independence Day. Shown at the Jerusalem Film Fest, July 1999

Body in the Sand

TITLE: Body in the Sand
YEAR: 1999
DIR/PROD: Riki Shelach
COUNTRY: Israel
LANGUAGE: Hebrew with English ST
TIME: 50
SOURCE: Riki Shelach Productions, Tel Aviv
TEXT: Winter 1946, the period of the British Mandate in Palestine. The commander of the Jewish underground is caught by the authorities and executed. Two members of the group are competing to take over his position. One is Banko, a charismatic activist and a woman-chaser, whose opponents accuse of low morals. The other is Joseph, an idealist who weighs matters carefully. During a preliminary stage in which both men are in control, there is complete paralysis. As a result, Joseph, the more moderate one, decides to invite Banko to a secret rendezvous on the beach and to kill him. His supporters bury the body in the sand and the secret in their hearts. Thirty-three years later, Joseph's party has won the elections. As Joseph is polishing his speech in anticipation of becoming a minister in the new government, a stranger knocks. Joseph is dismayed when the stranger unveils photos of the murder - albeit blurred but still incriminating - and threatens to publicize them if Joseph doesn't resign from the government. As Joseph seeks advice from his friends, secrets are exposed from the past, hidden details that were not known to all those involved so many years ago. Human weakness, power, cold idealism are all elements in this complicated drama abut the activities and personality of an extremist leader. Based on a play by Dina Lemon, Feldman. Stars Sasi Sa'ad, Israel Polyakov, Ezra Dagan, Shmuel Edelman, Rachel Dayan. Shown at the Jerusalem Film Fest, July 1999. NOTE TO FILE.... Geee maybe they should have Yitzhak Shamir play the lead?? Heehee

Borders

TITLE: Borders / VEGVUL NATAN...
YEAR: 1999
DIR/PROD: Nurit Kedar and Eran Riklis / Nurit Kedar
COUNTRY: Israel
LANGUAGE: Hebrew and Arabic, English subtitles
TIME: 56
SOURCE: Broadcast Video, Tel Aviv. Or contact: intl@pc-mill.com or www.ps-mill.com or write to Micky McAbian, 18226 Ventura Blvd, Suite 102, Tarzana CA 91356. Phone 818.708.9995 Email: INTL@ps-mill.com www.ps-mill.com
TEXT: A border is a place where one land ends and another begins. A border is a place where the territory of one country begins and that of another ends. Beyond the border, language, religion, culture, world-view and even physical landscape sometimes change. People live on both sides of the border, next to it, and sometimes, directly upon it. Beyond the geographical-political border, people develop additional borders: of fear and acceptance; of danger, love and belief; borders of longing for freedom and grey, ambiguous borders. So it is in every country with borders, including Israel. Israel has 1,171 km of borders with four states--Lebanon, Syria, Jordan, Egypt and the ambiguous Palestinian Authority. These borders differ from one another. Some appear to be peaceful and quiet, others are tense and raging. There are borders of peace and borders of war. The film Borders considers Israel's borders with its neighbors and introduces us to people who live and work in these sensitive areas, from war-torn southern Lebanon to the feverish and threatening Syrian border, crossed only by a Druse bride from the Golan; from the border of the Palestinian Authority to the Jordan River. There seem to be no good guys or bad guys. The protagonists speak of themselves. They act in accordance with political situations imposed upon them. Between the roadblocks, barbed wire, and minefields along the borders live Israelis, Lebanese, Jordanians, Syrians and Palestinians. Shown at the Jerusalem Film Fest, July 1999

Closed Country

TITLE: Closed Country
YEAR: 1999
DIR/PROD: Kaspar Kasics / Kaspar Kasics, Stefan Mächler
COUNTRY: Switzerland
LANGUAGE: French and German, English subtitles
TIME: 82
SOURCE: Swiss Film Center, Zurich. Carte Blanche: Vivian Ostrovsky. Or from First Hand Films, Bahnhofstr. 21, 8180 Bulach, Switzerland Tel: 41 1862 2106 Fax: 41 1862 2146 ALSO AVAILABLE FROM JewishFilm.ORG at Brandeis University Tel: 781-899-7044
TEXT: Like many other Jews, the Sonabend family sought refuge from Polish anti-Semitism at the beginning of the 20th century and emigrated to Brussels. Charles and Sabine were stillchildren when the Germans occupied Belgium. Their father had watch-making business in Switzerland and when deportations of Jews began, it seemed the natural asylum. Like many others, the Sonabends discovered that behind the cool Alpine neutrality were collaborators no better than those in German occupied countries. Unlike other exiles, including their parents, the brother and sister survived the death camps. Now, over 50 years later, they meet Fritz Straub, the Swiss government border official, and a nun from the nearby monastery. Both took orders from the Swiss police inspector Heinrich Rotmund whose main priorities were law and order. Since immigration of those "alien to the Swiss temperament", was discouraged, there was no choice but deport them as decently as possible, even if death at the hands of the Germans was inevitable. Thus, 30,000 individuals were POLITELY sent to certain death. Though at the end of the war, the deportation papers were MYSTERIOUSLY destroyed, those of the Sonabend family were mistakenly filed with ones of individuals who received asylum. Thus, many years after their deportation, evidence proving the connection between Swiss policy and the murder of his parents at Auschwitz accidentally fell into Charles' hands. Shown at the Jerusalem Film Fest, July 1999

DADDY GOES BEYOND

TITLE: DADDY GOES BEYOND /ABA HOLEKH LIKTZE HA`OLAM
YEAR: 1999
DIR/PROD: Tali Goder
COUNTRY: Israel
LANGUAGE: Hebrew with English ST
TIME: 60
SOURCE: Duke Prod. Ltd., Tel Aviv
TEXT: What would you do if you lost the sense of feeling in a finger and the doctor informed you that you have a year left to live, a year during which your body will gradually waste away with no chance for improvement? What would you do if you were destined to go through this entire process with a clear mind and ever growing isolation, because your ability to speak was slowly disappearing? This is what happened to Roni Yaakovi, 43 years old, a lawyer, secular, married with two children. Roni, an ideological cynic, touches upon the most basic existential questions: What is the point of a life of suffering in a withering body? Is suicide a solution, and if so, when? If one chooses life, is the respirator part of that life? What about the right to die with honor? Tamar, his wife, is totally against suicide. She wants to show that death is also part of life, so she brings a video camera into the house. The openness that begins with the revelation of personal truth develops into a new human partnership. Roni and Tamar embark together on the final journey, towards all that death brings with it, towards their separation. On the way they will face modern theology, with a variety of social insights imparted by family, friends, psychologists and mystics. But Roni and Tamar have another goal: to tell their love story. What was to be a painful experience of loss, turns out to be one of intimacy and spiritual elevation. The struggle for each breath linked their souls into one. Shown at the Jerusalem Film Fest, July 1999

SET ME FREE / Emporte Moi

TITLE: SET ME FREE / Emporte Moi
YEAR: 1999
DIR/PROD: Lea Pool / Lorraine Richard
COUNTRY: Canada / Switzerland / France
LANGUAGE: French with English ST
TIME: 94
SOURCE: Cite Amerique International, 5800 Blvd St Laurent, Montreal Quebec h2t 1t3, Canada, Email: phebert@mlink.net Tel: 33-1-41-41-14-66; or TFI International 305 ave la jour se leve, 92100 Boulogne France. Tel: 33 1414 2570 Fax: 33 1414 3176
TEXT: Montreal, 1963. Hannah is a 13-year old girl-at the difficult age on the seam between childhood and womanhood. Her father, a Polish Jewish immigrant, is a bitter writer without a country who doesn't know how to express his feelings, whose creative frustrations have an impact upon the life of the family. The sickly and fragile mother spends long hours working in a factory. As if her husband's sour face were not enough, she also has a quarrelsome mother. Hannah is the only child in the class from a Jewish background. Her refuge from all her troubles is the cinema. Again and again she goes to see
Vivre Se Vie (A story in 12 chapters about a young woman who leaves her husband and child, turns to casual prostitution, meets a pimp who makes her a professional, and then tries to quit when she falls in love) In this classic Nouvelle Vague film by Jean-Luc Godard, the prostitute Nana, ponders the meaning of life, turns into a virtual obsession. But the character portrayed by Anna Karina will lead Hannah safely to the liberty she seeks, which means understanding sensuality and recognizing obligation... Set Me Free is essentially an autobiographical film about growing up-from this alone one would be correct in assuming that it is a work rich in captivating lyrical content. The film also introduces a budding Quebec star of screen and stage, young Karine Vanasse. Much of the film's success is to her credit. Shown at the Jerusalem Film Fest, July 1999. Washington DC Jewish Film Fest 12/99

Four friends

TITLE: Four Friends / PEGISHA HOZERET
YEAR: 1999
DIR/PROD: Ester Dar / Naomi Ben Natan Schory
COUNTRY: Israel
LANGUAGE: English, Arabic and Hebrew, English and Hebrew subtitles
TIME: 61
SOURCE: Belshire Films, Tel Aviv
TEXT: It is a Jerusalem summer day in 1998. At the American Colony Hotel, on the seam dividing Jerusalem, four women meet. Salma Dajani, from a Jaffa Palestinian Muslim family; Widad Shahade, a Christian Arab, also from Jaffa; Olga Belkind from Rishon Le Zion; and Sharona from Tel Aviv. The four met and shared a dormitory room in an English College in Jerusalem during the 1930s. In the closed world of their school, they became friends. At an early age, Widad and Salma married cousins and established their family homes in Jaffa. In 1948, with the establishment of the State of Israel, the link with their Jewish friends was broken. Olga was drafted to the IDF, Sharona did public relations work for Israel in the U.S. and returned to work at the Army Radio station. Like most residents of Jaffa, Salma and Widad fled. The family home was locked as if they had left on vacation. They didn't have enough time to put a monument on the grave of Dr. Fuad, their father. Widad and her husband, the lawyer Aziz Shahade, fled to Ramallah which was under Hashemite control. After 1967 Shahade believed in the possibility of dialogue between Israelis and Palestinians. In 1985 he was murdered. The reason for the murder was never discovered. The establishment of the State of Israel in 1948 was, for Olga and Sharona, the realization of a dream. For Widad and Salma it was the beginning of an enduring tragedy. 50 years later, in a meeting of old girlfriends, the historical events are reflected in their personal lives. Shown at the Jerusalem Film Fest, July 1999

HARMED FORCES / KOHOTENU LO SHAVU

TITLE: HARMED FORCES / KOHOTENU LO SHAVU
YEAR: 1999
DIR/PROD: Irit Gal / Idit Mistriel
COUNTRY: Israel
LANGUAGE: Hebrew, English subtitles
TIME: 56
SOURCE: Telad, Tel Aviv Fax 972.3.561-1451 or www.ps-mill.com Tel: 818-708-9995 in Tarzana CA
TEXT: In June 1982 the IDF began a brief military campaign in Lebanon, called "Operation Peace for the Galilee." Today, 17 years later, Israel is still soldiers to Lebanon, and for the hundreds suffering battle shock from that miserable war, nothing has ended. Roni and Israel are ex-paratroopers who never recovered. The battlefield where they fought was a city; the enemy, a civilian population. Since then, a busy life in Tel Aviv only brings back the trauma of the war. They returned home shattered, their families disintegrated, their wives unable to cope with their panic attacks. "We left there alive but our souls remained in that cursed land. It's impossible to understand or overcome it." Roni Yarkoni was a family man well known for his social life before the war. He ran a successful business and outfitted the famous. Today, he lives with his mother and is unable to function without drugs. His wife and children have become religious and left. Visiting the seashore and hanging out with the homeless and ill is his only escape. Israel Siman-Tov was an officer in the paratroopers' Raven Patrol. Today he is married for the fourth time, and struggling to maintain his sanity in the framework of his studies at Tel Aviv University and at his job. He has returned to the army as an ordinance inspector. Only there does he find an escape from his fears and nightmares. Thousands suffering from battle shock are living in our midst. Ashamed to speak of it they hide, while society ignores them. They say that The Isralei government and society would rather have a dead hero than a live shell shocked veteran. During filming there is one suicide, and another after filming was completed. The filming was the impetus for the creation of a support group, which was flooded with calls on its first announcement of operation. Jerusalem Shown at the Jerusalem Film Fest, July 1999. This is what filmmaking is all about. The use of editing techniques and quick flashbacks creates for the viewer a feeling of what those injured are going through

Her Bare Feet

TITLE: her Bare Feet / KAPOT RAGLEYHA
YEAR: 1999
DIR/PROD: Jorge Gurvich
COUNTRY: Israel
LANGUAGE: Hebrew with English ST
TIME: 52
SOURCE: La Strada Productions, Herzliya
TEXT: An adolescent love story. uring a vacation in Tel Aviv, Avinoam, a country boy, meets Betty, a girl from the big city and falls madly in love with her. Two children, aged 14, are about to discover their sexuality. Relishing the opportunity to get away from his annoying family and to stay with his dear Uncle Naftali, Avinoam returns to visit Betty. Betty has cast her spell upon him and in order to conquer her, he must meet a variety of challenges. But his success doesn't win Betty's heart because she has her eye on another. Frustrated and hurt, Avinoam looks for a way out of his disgrace and unrequited love, and resorts to extremes that surprise those around him... Her Bare Feet, a new film by Jorge Gurvich (The Shower, JFF 1997), maintains an atmosphere of innocent and magical love typical of stories of adolescence. Eyal Gaber carries the story in his multifaceted cinematic debut. Dor Florentine is charming and sensitive. The young actors are surrounded by a cast that supplies depth to the adolescent-adult relations. Starring Eyal Gaber, Dor Florentin, Avi Kushnir, Liat Goren, Uri Abrahami, and Claudia Della Seta. Shown at the Jerusalem Film Fest, July 1999

His Heart Was Left Here

TITLE: His Heart Was Left Here
YEAR: 1999
DIR/PROD: Iouri Goroulev
COUNTRY: Belarus
LANGUAGE: Russian
TIME: unknown
SOURCE: contact Jerusalem Film Fest at http://www.jer-cin.org.il
TEXT: At the center of this documentary film is Marc Chagall, one of the outstanding painters of the 20th century, who expressed nostalgia and longing for the Jewish shtetl of the beginning of the century. Built around first person narration and based on Chagall's life experience, Goroulev weaves the threads between the artist's personal biography and his work. His youth in a small shtetl, the synogogue, the sabbath, his desire to be an artist, all these find a place in his paintings, and are conveyed to us in the film through intelligent camera work. Chagall's transition to Paris, and his return to the Soviet Union are also expressed in his work, emphasizing the artist's appreciation of his birthplace which was for him both a home and a source of inspiration. Shown at the Jerusalem Film Fest, July 1999

Instructions Not Included

TITLE: Instructions Not Included / BLI DAF HORA'OT
YEAR: 1999
DIR/PROD: Keren Atzmon / Ronnie Manor
COUNTRY: Israel
LANGUAGE: Hebrew with English ST
TIME: 50
SOURCE: Jif Prod., Tel Aviv
TEXT: Ronen, Nati's boyfriend of about two years, proposes going to the next stage in their relationship and moving in together. Meanwhile, Nati starts to share a darkroom with Shai and a new set of rules emerges. Shai is the complete opposite of Ronen-unpredictable, rebellious and direct. Meeting him forces Nati to reexamine her life. Instructions Not Included presents the lives of three girls in their twenties who share an apartment in Tel Aviv. Their problems, fears, hesitations, and finally, their decisions form the plot of the film. Nati is stuck with an image of success and does everything that's expected of her. Her friend Zoe breaks rules and provokes. Roni lives in a world of illusions and prefers not to deal with real life. In her innocence, she is oblivious to the changes taking place around her. Each of us creates a self-image that becomes "obligatory" and difficult to change. It predetermines the way in which others see us. The film shows the desire of each of the protagonists to change and to free herself from the label that has been stuck upon her. Each of the girls deals with her friendships with the other two and with her external relationships in a different manner. The film is about transitions and the thin line between dependence and freedom. Stars Maya Laub, Gal Hoyberger, Meital Dohan, Hanoch Reim, Liat Glick. Shown at the Jerusalem Film Fest, July 1999

Jew-Boy Levi

TITLE: Jew Boy Levi / VIEHJUD LEVI
YEAR: 1999
DIR/PROD: Didi Danquart / Martin Hagemann
COUNTRY: Germany
LANGUAGE: German with English ST
TIME: 97
SOURCE: Martin Hagemann, Zero Film, Lehrter Strasse 57, Berlin D-10557 Germany zerofilm@bln.de OR Cinepool, Sonnenstrasse 21, 80331 Munchen Germany Tel: 49 89 5587 60 Fax 4989 5587 6188
TEXT: Viehjud is an old, deragatory German word for a Jew in the cattle trade (there were many, ask Dr Ruth). Based upon play by Thomas Strittmatter. It is set in Germany in 1935. Levi, a young cattle dealer (there were many Jews in the cattle biz), arrives on business to the Black Forest region of Deutschland. A figure known to the local people, his Judaism never kept people from being friendly to him. During his present visit Levi intends to resolve some matters of the heart with a local girl named Lisbeth. But times have changed. A group of representatives of the new regime in Berlin, are in the area. The familiar old order begins to collapse: swastikas suddenly appear at the beer hall; the cattle farmers will no longer sell their herds to the Jew; anonymous people disturb Levi's peace-a world that was friendly previously has turned hostile. Will Lisbeth join her neighbors and turn her back on Levi? German actress Eva Mattes, of Fassbinder fame, plays Frau Horger. Jew-Boy Levi is an outstanding play by Thomas Strittmatter-a prolific artist who passed away several years ago at age 35. The original work was based upon stories he heard from his father and grandfather concerning a Jewish cattle merchant-"What really happened to Levi after the Nazis rose to power?" Didi Danquart, generally a documentary filmmaker, remained as faithful as possible to the original staging instructions while preserving the subtle, restrained irony that guides the story as well as the modernist elements it embodies. The director writes that "Levi is a microcosm in which one can discover fascism just as much as contemporary ethnic conflicts." Shown at the Jerusalem Film Fest, July 1999 and the SFJFF 1999, and Berlin 1999

THE JEWISH CHILDREN

TITLE: The Jewish Children
YEAR: 1999
DIR/PROD: Vicki Shiran / Boris Maftsir
COUNTRY: Israel
LANGUAGE: Hebrew w/ English ST
TIME: 40
SOURCE: Israel Film Service, Jerusalem
TEXT: Since its inception, Yad Vashem has gathered a collection of remarkable and authentic documents: hundreds of photographs of children from the Holocaust period have been collected in the archives of Yad Vashem. Very little is known about the children in these photos, occasionally only their names, sometimes the name of the city they came from. But on most appears the simple notation: "no information." The Jewish Children is a personal journey and observation of these old photos. The first half of the film describes the pre-war life of children utilizing portraits from family albums. When the historical reality changed, the character of the documentation also changed. Many of the photographs from the war period were made by the Nazis. The clothing, the appearance, and the situation show these children as marked and ostracized. Based entirely upon photographs of hundreds of children from different countries, the film gradually constructs a very personal profile of The Jewish Children. This approach succeeds in transmitting the personal tragedy of every child and the collective tragedy of a people. An intentional distancing-throughout the film, no name appears next to the photos of the children; there is no focus upon the story of any specific child-provokes an intellectual reaction alongside the powerful emotional experience of the film. Shown at the Jerusalem Film Fest, July 1999

Kain and Artem

TITLE: Kain and Artem / KAIN I ARTEM
YEAR: 1929
DIR/PROD: Pavel Petrov-Bytov /
COUNTRY: USSR
LANGUAGE: silent with Dutch IT
TIME: 86
SOURCE: Nederland Filmmuseum, Vondelpark 3, 1071 AA Amsterdam, The Netherlands Tel: 31 20 589 1400 Fax: 31 20 683 3401
TEXT: Stars Gyorgy Uwarov, Yelena Yegorova, Emil Gal, and Nicolai Simonov. Based upon a story by Maxim Gorky. In a small provincial town on the banks of the Volga, a poor porter named Artem falls in love with the beautiful wife of the fish merchant. The latter is not pleased with this and hires a gang to scare Artem away from the village. Artem is thrown into the river and is saved by a Jewish shoemaker, Kain. Kain and Artem is one of the few Soviet Jewish movies that is not based upon a Jewish literary source. The influence of the Communist regime is strongly felt here, which made the film a source of criticism and ridicule among U.S. critics during the 1930s. Still, a sober look at this film from the end of the century, after the collapse of the Soviet Union, gives it a nostalgic dimension and permits a rare view of the revolutionary pathos and the reawakening of Jewish identity during those years. Moreover, produced under the artistic revolution that the Bolsheviks brought, it meets the famous Soviet standards for montage. Though produced after the invention of sound movies, it was never intended as a talkie. The '98 Rotterdam Festival initiated a program to restore silent films of this type. Shown at the Jerusalem Film Fest, July 1999

Katy

TITLE: Katy
YEAR: 1999
DIR/PROD: Rachel Shvarts
COUNTRY: Israel
LANGUAGE: Hebrew with English ST
TIME: 50
SOURCE: Top Line Communications, Kiryat Shemona
TEXT: Rachel Schwarts writes the following: In the next to the last scene, Aliza says to her daughter Katy: 'You stole the show from me.' I have no doubt that Aliza Dadon deserves her own film. A beautiful and proud woman with a sharp tongue and lovely voice. Aliza, who during the course of her life fell into nearly all of the possible traps, knows that there is no way out. She has 11 children. She cannot provide a loving home for them. She is still looking for the love that she was deprived of during her own childhood and she still continues to dream. She dreams of appearing for one short evening under the spotlights, in front of a cheering crowd. This film gives her that opportunity, but it isn't her film. It's her youngest daughter Katy's. At the age of five, Katy was sent to the Children's Village institution after passing through several foster families. From her grandmother Marcel and her mother Aliza, Katy got sparkling eyes and a clear voice. All the rest she did herself. My film begins with Katy's class project: she directs a film about her life. The camera accompanies her and her friends waiting in the village, to the happiest moment in her life, when the draft board informs her that she has been accepted in the army performing troupe. Her happiness makes her departure from the Children's Village easier. She looks even more beautiful and strong in uniform, but the road ahead is full of dangers. Nine of her ten brothers ended up in jail, involved in crime and drugs. Katy believes that she will break the cycle of tragedy in her family. Katy Dadon wants to sing. A new song. About what you can be. Shown at the Jerusalem Film Fest, July 1999

KHROUSTALIOV, MY CAR! / KHROUSTALIOV, MA VOITURE!

TITLE: KHROUSTALIOV, MY CAR! / KHROUSTALIOV, MA VOITURE!
YEAR: 1999
DIR/PROD: Alexei Guerman / Guy Seligman, Armen Medvedev, Alexandre Golutva
COUNTRY: Russia/France 1998
LANGUAGE: Russian with English ST
TIME: 137
SOURCE: Flach Pyramide International, 5 Rue Richepanse, 75008 Paris, France Tel: 33 1 4296 0220 Fax: 33 1 4020 0551
TEXT: Black and white. Red Army General Yuri Glinsky is chief of department at a Moscow hospital and father of a large family. He's a big man, bald, mustached, Tatar-like in appearance, with a permanent smile on his face. In 1953 the general falls prey to Stalin's anti-Semitic "doctors' plot", is arrested by the secret police and sent to the gulag. As the "Sun of the Peoples" approaches death, Beria takes Glinsky out of imprisonment in the hope that he will be able to cure the boss. Ten years pass and, far from Moscow, far from his family, the ex-general passes through the Russian landscapes as leader of an all powerful crime syndicate... Alexei Guerman is one of the most talented Russian directors and this is the first of his films not subject to the rigors of Soviet censorship. Extravagant and phantasmagorical, Khroustaliov is a unique work. Not all will be able to swallow it or digest its complicated narrative; "Fellini directing a script by Beckett" a clever reviewer joked. But if you allow yourself to be swept along by Glinsky's deeds and by the brilliant visuals, and if you're able to cope with its original treatment of Russian anti-Semitism, you'll be fascinated by this work that already holds a place of honor in the pantheon of world cinema. Shown at the Jerusalem Film Fest, July 1999

The Maelstrom

TITLE: The Maelstrom - A Family Chronicle / DE MAALSTROOM-EEN FAMILIEKRONIEK
YEAR: 1998
DIR/PROD: Peter Forgacs
COUNTRY: Netherlands
LANGUAGE: English
TIME: 60
SOURCE: Lumenfilm, Korte Prinsengracht 17-d, 1013 GN Amsterdam, The Netherlands, Tel: 31 20 6232 600 Fax: 31 20 6254 830 pforgacs@mail.datanet.hu
TEXT: Holland 1933. The Peereboom family celebrates the silver anniversary of the parents, Josef and Flora. Among those celebrating are their three sons: Simon, the youngest, Louis in the middle, and Max, the eldest, who arrives with his fiancee Annie. Max documents the event with his home movie camera. From here until September 4, 1942, the eve of the deportation of his family to Auschwitz, he will document his family's history and events in the Dutch kingdom in silent, black-and-white film. Forgacs is known for his use of home movies in the making of films. Here, he slowly builds the daily Peereboom family routine: trips and vacations; Max's training in the Red Cross (precisely at the time when the Germans invade Austria); the marriages of the two elder sons; and the birth of grandchildren at the time when Holland was already under Nazi German occupation. Forgacs wasn't satisfied with this and added home movie segments filmed by the family of the German governor of Holland, a nice looking clerk with glasses. The irony created by the juxtaposition of the two families and the knowledge of subsequent events, turn these innocent images of the Peereboom family, at the beach, getting married and having children, into something particularly bitter-sweet. Our feeling of helplessness grows into a suppressed scream as the final images appear on screen: this nice Jewish family is preparing clothes for the journey to the "labor camps" in Germany. Shown at the Jerusalem Film Fest, July 1999

Martin

TITLE: Martin
YEAR: 1999
DIR/PROD: Ra'anan Alexandrowicz
COUNTRY: Israel
LANGUAGE: Hebrew with English ST
TIME: 50
SOURCE: David Ofer Productions, Tel Aviv or from First Hand Films (Switzerland) Esther Van Messel, First Hand Films Bahnhofstrasse 21, 8180 Bulach Switzerland Tel: ++41 1 862 21 06 Fax: ++41 1 862 21 46 Email: info@firsthandfilms.com
TEXT: The first and nearly accidental visit of three young tourists at the Dachau concentration camp memorial leads to an unexpected chain of events. Just before returning to Munich, they notice, in the distance, an old man engaged in an argument with one of the employees. Thus begins a brief and confusing meeting with a survivor of the camp. The old man drags the three through the camp, complaining about the manner in which the site has been memorialized, and attempting to convey to them something about what really happened in this place where today grass and flowers have been planted. Afterwards, he gets onto a public bus and disappears into the lanes of the nearby town of Dachau. The three young people find themselves obsessively returning to the camp, day after day, in order to meet this strange old survivor of the camp, who chose to live his life in the adjacent village, a place attempting to change its image and to free itself from the oppressive shadow of memory. At the heart of the film lies an inconsistent documentary portrait of the survivor; more than objectively documenting him, the three tourists are swept along by him. Over the course of four days, they find their view of the man constantly changing. The accidental manner in which the story unfolds provokes questions concerning remembrance and the manner in which historical truth is created, as well as the relation between historical truth and memory. Shown at the Jerusalem Film Fest, July 1999; Shown in Ramallah and in Germany. Shown at New Director MOMA NYC, March 2000. SPOILERS NOTES TO FILE: Actually, the filmmakers met Martin alone on his first visit to Dachau. He wanted to meet him again, and returned with his friends. From there the story unfolds. The theme may be: Look, the film is not here to be an investigation into what is true or not, and experts will tell you that the memories of survivors may not be the most reliable, but having a living person take you on a tour of Dachau versus the museum experience opens you up to an entirely different experience. OTHER NOTE TO FILE: If you want to read the real investigation into the current town of Dachau and Martin, check out the book "THE LAST SURVIVOR" available from MyJewishBooks.com

Menelik

TITLE: Menelik
YEAR: 1999
DIR/PROD: Daniel Wachsmann
COUNTRY: Israel
LANGUAGE: Hebrew and Amharic, English subtitles
TIME: 56
SOURCE: Cnaan Galil Productions, Amuqa Israel; Telephone: 011- 972-6-692-1990 Fax: 011-972-3-528-1211 or email daniw@newmail.net
TEXT: The story of Gadi Abaja, a young Ethiopian living on the margins of Israeli society in the Central Bus Station of Tel Aviv. He survives by theft and petty larceny. His dream is to turn the public address system of the Central Bus Station into an Amharic radio station, as a symbol of culture and minority protest. Gadi misses his mother very much, writes her letters and awaits her reply, though it never arrives. The film follows his journey in search of his past to the emotion-filled reunion with his mother. Another connective narrative level in this film is the story of the legend of Menelik, son of King Solomon and the Queen of Sheba. As the son of a Jewish father (Ethiopian Soldier) and Christian mother (Janet), Gadi is, like some other Ethiopians, a descendent of Menelik, the black Jewish prince. This film may be an attempt to confront issues of contemporary Ethiopian identity in modern Israel. Or it may be just a film about a petty, lazy, 21 year old thief who is homeless and returns to Ethiopia in search for the mother he left behind. The crises Ethiopian Jewry has endured since its arrival in Israel, doubts raised concerning its Jewishness, the forced conversions. The isolation and separation of family members over long periods, misunderstanding concerning its culture and character, absorption and surrender to decisions imposed by the establishment-have all pushed some of the Ethiopian immigrants into the margins of Israeli society. The story of Menelik/Gadi, is an attempt to clarify the identity of a young individual whose personal story and journey to Ethiopia take on a social significance. Shown at the Jerusalem Film Fest, July 1999; and at the NY Jewish Film Fest, January 2000. Note to file: As of January 2000, Gadi returned to Ethiopia and is hanging out

Moments of Grace

TITLE: Moments of Grace / RIG'EI HESED
YEAR: 1999
DIR/PROD: Iosef Shiloa, Jorge Gurvich
COUNTRY: Israel
LANGUAGE: Hebrew with English ST
TIME: 54
SOURCE: La Strada Productions, Tel Aviv
TEXT: Asaf's mother completely controls his life and all that surrounds it, but she couldn't control the fact of his birth. Fate played a genetic trick upon Asaf. It predetermined the label society would place upon him: "exceptional child." But can Liat, who Asaf will eventually marry, share in his fate? Was she likewise tricked by fate? How can one establish the point at which life betrayed Liat? What do those sad, dark eyes hide? They seem to say "You will never penetrate the transparent screen that separates me from you. My lashes are the wings of the dragonfly through which I will penetrate your world, but you shall never know mine." A mother's struggle, from the day her son is born, to turn him into a normal child. Her dream is that Asaf will marry a normal girl, and this dream comes true. Beyond that motherly hope that things would turn out well for her son Asaf and that his physical needs would be satisfied, did Asaf's mother consider Liat? Do Liat's hopes and desires have any place in her ideas concerning what makes a person free? Where would fate have taken Liat if she hadn't met Asaf? Would she have continued to shampoo customers' hair in a beauty salon 11 hours a day? And if Liat reveals her true feelings, will she unveil her tortured soul and remove the dragonfly wings from her eyes? A film about a struggle with love and fate. Shown at the Jerusalem Film Fest, July 1999

On Air / Zman Avir

TITLE: On Air / Zman Avir
YEAR: 1999
DIR/PROD: Isaac Zepel Yeshurun
COUNTRY: Israel
LANGUAGE: Hebrew with English ST
TIME: 80
SOURCE: Zepel Films Ltd., Tel Aviv
TEXT: In America, people are discussing the Vertical Society and the Horizontal Society. Maybe they should be discussing the coming of the Cell-Phone Society. A family in crisis: Father, Haim (45), his daughter (17) and his son (23), a student in Jerusalem. The mother died several years ago following an illness. Haim tries to watch over the family via his cellular phone. It's tough. He doesn't know that his daughter is in love with an Arab. The son in Jerusalem is distancing himself from him. Haim, alone, desperately courts Ina, a young Russian girl who lives in Ashdod, over the phone. Ina is afraid of getting involved. Haim, a former General Security Services man, is called for several days reserve duty to renew the connection with one of his former agents. The same Arab, of American background, is none other than his daughter's lover. Discovery of his daughter's "Arab connection" puts Haim off balance. His daughter attacks him for his hypocrisy and the son, a rightist in a left-wing family, attacks him for the mess his sister has gotten into. The aim of the mission-uncovering a Hamas cell-jeopardizes his efforts to preserve the unity of his family and his own integrity. Haim's plan, to solve the problem of the Hamas cell and get the Arab boyfriend out of the country, fails. He finds himself instead in a trap set up by his opponents. This is an Israeli family held together by the cellular phone. Its members crave warmth and intimacy. From the midst of their lonliness, they strive to survive as a unit. Stars Moshe Ivgi, Genia Dodina, Galina Svidanski, Dana Ivgi, Mike Furman, Dvir Bandak, Irit Gidron, Yuval Segal. Shown at the Jerusalem Film Fest, July 1999

Perets and the Wolf

TITLE: Perets and the Wolf
YEAR: 1999
DIR/PROD: Amit Goren
COUNTRY: Israel
LANGUAGE: Hebrew and Mongolian with English ST
TIME: 51
SOURCE: Home Productions, Tel Aviv
TEXT: Egoah, 66 years old, a Mongolian hunter and former economist, recalls an ancient saying describing the meeting between man and wolf: "If the wolf doesn't show himself to the man, they say that man has less luck than a wolf. If the man succeeds in seeing the wolf, they say he has the luck of a wolf. But if the man is able to hunt the wolf, then they say he has more luck than a wolf, and that is a lot of luck." Egoah has hunted many wolves during his lifetime. Perets, an inspector for the Israel Nature Protection and National Parks Authority, is involved in a project to protect the wolf population of the Golan Heights. He participates in a special mission directed by an expert from the U.S. aimed at capturing wolves. From a helicopter, they shoot the wolves with anesthetic arrows to enable capture, examination and study. But Perets also puts his luck to the test and goes to the Mongolian plains where he accompanies the wolf-hunters in their contest with the main predator of this vast area. Does Perets have enough luck to see a wolf? An exciting journey between two cultures with significantly different relationships with nature and its life cycle. Shown at the Jerusalem Film Fest, July 1999

Rosenzweig's Freedom

TITLE: Rosenzweig's Freedom
YEAR: 1998
DIR/PROD: Liliane Targownik
COUNTRY: Germany
LANGUAGE: german with English ST
TIME: 89
SOURCE: Sud west rundfunk, SWR Media GmbH, Hermann Sieckenstr. 66, D-76530 Baden Baden, Germany Tel: 49 7221 929 4411 Fax: 49 7221 929 4418
TEXT: Stars Benjamin Sadler, Christof Gareissen, Gertrud Roll, Peter Roggisch. Germany, September 1991. A group of skinheads attacks a foreign workers' hostel. The same night, a Neo-Nazi leader is shot and killed. Michael Rosenzweig, a simple worker, is the main susepct in the murder of the neo-Nazi. He was with his Vietnamese girlfriend when the hostel was attacked, but doesn't recall what happened that evening. His brother Jacob, a young attorney, takes on his defense. Two Jewish brothers, children of a Holocaust survivor, in a head-on confrontation with the ugly, growing wave of extreme rightist violence in Germany. Rosenzweig's Freedom deals with the domestic social situation in Germany of the '90s, in the shadow of a violent past. While the events described here are imaginary, they take place within a context of authentic social conflicts and emphasize that in today's Germany, history is not history when it recurs on a daily basis. This is an uncompromising journey into the world of oppressors and their victims, dealing with issues that cannot be summarized by cliches or simple formulas. The denial chosen by the two Jewish brothers, their clear separation from the painful past of their Holocaust-survivor mother, is equivalent to the amnesia that enables the skinheads to perpetrate their evil. This is a discussion of the role of society's victims and the manner in which they overcome their feelings of anger and frustration. It asks the question: Are victims permitted to kill in revenge? Shown at the Jerusalem Film Fest, July 1999

THE ROTH EXPLOSION

TITLE: THE ROTH EXPLOSION
YEAR: 1998
DIR/PROD: Christa Maerker cmaerker@aol.com
COUNTRY: Germany
LANGUAGE: English
TIME: 53
SOURCE: Telepool Saarbrucken, Postvach Sloss Halberd 66100, Saarbrucken, Germany 49 681 602 3955 OR FROM Christa Maerker, Sybelstrasse 45, Berlin 10629 Germany cmaerker@aol.com
TEXT: Philip Roth is an American novelist who lets some of the protagonists of his autobiographical novels write autobiographical novels. He hides within his works, creates reality, entices his critics to ask what is fact and what is fancy. He belongs to the most read and esteemed elite in American literature. Last year, he won the Pulitzer Prize for American Pastoral, his 22nd book. He was born in Newark, New Jersey in 1933 to a family of Yiddish-speaking, Eastern European immigrants. The inner contradictions of his life have also turned into the subject matter of his books: the Jewish milieu within the broader American context and his attempts to escape. The result are feelings of guilt that permeate his books and give them an atmosphere that wavers between solemnity and madcap comedy (e.g., the hero of Portnoy's Complaint who calls himself "the Raskolnikov of whacking off"). The clever comic portions of his works are what make Philip Roth so controversial (even to the extent of having been labeled anti-Semitic on occasion). Philip Roth left the big city for the privacy of Connecticut. The hype surrounding his divorce from actress Claire Bloom, who also published a book about it, was more than enough for him. In this film, one of the few occasions on which he has agreed to be interviewed, he chooses to evaluate his life through three of his latest books. He speaks about his childhood, about the accusations against him and about his most recent work, after which the film is named. Shown at the Jerusalem Film Fest, July 1999

A Sign from Heaven

TITLE: A Sign from Heaven / SIMAN MISHAMAYIM
YEAR: 1999
DIR/PROD: Ariella Azoulay
COUNTRY: Israel
LANGUAGE: Hebrew with English ST
TIME: 55
SOURCE: Ariella Azoulay, Tel Aviv
TEXT: A Sign from Heaven concerns three famous recent episodes of violence: Rabin's assassination by Yigal Amir, Carmella Buhbut's killing of her husband Yehuda, and the elimination of the "Engineer" Yehiya Ayash by Israeli security forces. The film examines aspects of each of these episodes and exposes a surprising network of similarities connecting them. The manner in which an episode is presented as "murder," "killing" or "elimination", determines the distinction between these three categories. How are photography, physical evidence, and reconstruction at the scene of the violent act used to justify, stigmatize, erase or memorialize an particular episode? The film goes beyond the boundaries of a documentary. Each of its 22 segments is part of a lexicon defining terms from A to Z including "ID card," "Peace," "State," "Trauma," and "Violence." Aside from the two narrators, all of the speakers in the film hold positions in the various institutions related to the three episodes. A Sign from Heaven casts doubt upon familiar ideological formulas and shows the way in which different types of language-scientific, legal, liberal-democratic-further complicate the web of violence and give it legitimacy in certain cases in order to blur its origins in others. Shown at the Jerusalem Film Fest, July 1999

What I Saw in Hebron

TITLE: What I saw in Hebron
YEAR: 1999
DIR/PROD: Dan and Noit Geva
COUNTRY: Israel
LANGUAGE: Hebrew and Arabic, English subtitles
TIME: 73
SOURCE: Noga Communications. 972.3.648.2118; or The Israel Film Archive, hakirya romema pob 13240 Jerusalem 91130 israel Tel: 972-2-651-3223 Fax: 972-2-652-6818
TEXT: The director writes, "My grandmother never spoke about what she saw in Hebron during the massacre of 1929 when she was 16 years old. She was so traumatized that until her dying day, she could never speak about it, except for once. The day after the massacre she wrote about what she had seen. My father never told her, but when he was 11 years old, he found what she had written. Only after my eldest daughter was born did my father decide to let me read what grandmother had written. At the top of the wrinkled page appear the words: `What I Saw in Hebron'. Once I started, I was unable to stop reading: From the ground floor, we heard moans and screams for help and we couldn't get out. Suddenly, we heard a knock at the door. Seeing the daggers, I lost all hope of being saved, so I hurried to climb to the roof, planning to throw myself to the ground. I began climbing. Suddenly, I felt someone pulling me back. It was an Arab acquaintance. He pulled me and took us to the cellar beneath his house. A short time after, he brought more Jews whom had saved... My grandmother, granddaughter of the Sephardic Chief Rabbi Eliyahu Mani of the Jewish community of Hebron, decided that same day that there is no God. Since I read my Grandmother Zmira's testimony, I discovered, to my disbelief, that this story had never been told. I located another 12 survivors who present their testimony here for the first and perhaps the last time. Today, some of them forgive, others don't, but all of them want to believe that if not in their lifetimes, then at least in their children's, we might see better days, like ones they remember 70 years ago, when Jews and Arabs lived together." (Noit Geva) Shown at the Jerusalem Film Fest, July 1999

White Lies

TITLE: White Lies
YEAR: 1999
DIR/PROD: Yitzhak Rubin
COUNTRY: Israel
LANGUAGE: Hebrew with English ST
TIME: 90
SOURCE: Teknews (Media) Inc., Haifa
TEXT: A theater director returns to Israel after several years living in Paris-to recover from the failure of his first play and to escape an unresolved love affair. The illusion of escape vanishes when he is told that his mother, a Holocaust survivor, has a terminal disease. A complex drama develops within the family, involving the white lies of the different family members. The son hides the mother's illness from her; she in turn ignores his sense of failure; the doctor-a family friend who had misdiagnosed the mother's illness earlier on-cooperates with the son in hiding the facts. Only the daughter, who arrives from abroad, tries to shatter the conspiracy of lies... Fear of loss, physical or metaphysical, is the pivot upon which the drama of this film turns, following parallel lines for each of the protagonists. Precisely when death approaches and annihilation seems inevitable, the impulse for mutual protection grows, along with the desire to preserve a sense of normalcy within the family, even if that involves white lies. However, the constant tension between lie and reality intensifies as the moment of truth approaches-for death creates situations of great emotional power and often leads to absurdities full of humor, love and compassion. Even the "objective" truth, represented by the hero's sister, who places the facts before the family for its approval, has no value if it is cruel and insensitive. Shown at the Jerusalem Film Fest, July 1999

Yolande Remembered

TITLE: Yolande Remembered
YEAR: 1999
DIR/PROD: Dan Wolman / Talilah Grinberg
COUNTRY: Israel
LANGUAGE: English and Hebrew with English ST
TIME: 125
SOURCE: Dan Wolman, Tel Aviv
TEXT: With the aid of Professor Yoav Gelber, this is a documentary about Yolande Harmor, a journalist, born in Alexandria, who passed information from Egypt to the Yishuv during the 1940s. A member of high society, Yolande considered herself to be an Egyptian, loved her homeland and labored to bring about understanding between the two peoples. During the period of World War II and immediately following, she socialized with senior Egyptian leaders and foreign diplomats and attempted to encourage those elements in the Arab world who did not see the establishment of a Jewish state as a threat. Only later, when it became apparent that a clash between Israel and the Arab states was inevitable, she undertook activities in Egypt for the Political Department of the Jewish Agency and passed on information crucial to the existence of Israel. The film follows the path of her fascinating life, from her imprisonment in Egypt, to her life in Paris and her aliyah to Israel with her son during the early 1950s. The film also deals with the societal and governmental relationship to Yolande during that period and with her death from cancer in Jerusalem in 1957. Shown at the Jerusalem Film Fest, July 1999

You Can Thank Me Later

TITLE: You Can Thank Me Later
YEAR: 1999
DIR/PROD: Shimon Dotan
COUNTRY: USA
LANGUAGE: English
TIME: 110
SOURCE: Danehip Entertainment, Tarzana, California
TEXT: The concerned members of the Cooperberg family gather around the sickbed of their father, who has undergone difficult surgery. Still awaiting the results, they examine their family relations. Shirley, the mother, is a domineering woman with a tendency toward denial: she pushes her children away and pulls them toward her at the same time and doesn't understand that the chicks have grown and flown from the nest. Edward, the oldest, is a successful theater producer- a notorious skirt-chaser whose marriage is crumbling. Eli is a sensitive writer who earns a living from the family business. Hysterical Susan, with artistic aspirations and lesbian tendencies, still lives on a monthly allowance from her parents. Based upon a script by Oren Safdie, Shimon Dotan presents a claustrophobic family drama concerning a variety of struggles- private, family, Jewish. He places clever dialogues in the mouths of the protagonists and complements the main characters with rich secondary figures (an existentialist TV technician, a sexy nurse, women from past and present, etc.). The family members relate the emotions that torture them to the camera as if it were a psychologist or at least, a confessor, but among the dense relations are humorous situations as well. Stars Ellen Burstyn, Amanda Plummer, Ted Levine, Mark Blum, Mary McDonnell, and Genevieve Bujold. Shown at the Jerusalem Film Fest, July 1999; and at the Montreal Fest 1999

Zinzana

TITLE: Zinzana
YEAR: 1999
DIR/PROD: Haim Bouzaglo / Miki Rabinovitz, David Zilber
COUNTRY: Israel
LANGUAGE: Hebrew with English ST
TIME: 100
SOURCE: Sal Prod., Tel Aviv
TEXT: Two chapters in the TV drama series about all aspects of life in prisons in Israel-women's prisons, men's prisons, prisoners and guards, interpersonal relations within prison walls and between prisoners and their friends and families on the outside. Haim Bouzaglo gathered the best actors in Israel, some 160 in all, and held a workshop to familiarize them with the world of prisons. Thus, many of the characters portrayed are based upon real Israeli crime figures. The actors met the characters they portrayed and studied them in depth. Bouzaglo once more utilized a method of direction which encourages improvisation, while cinematographer Yoram Milo filmed with flowing authenticity. The result is an exciting, moving and convincingly portrayed series of real stories that go beyond the imaginable. Lieutenant Squadron Leader Shlomo Tuizer who, at the time of filming was commander of a group of prisons at Ramle, revealed his own difficult and fascinating life-story to Haim Bouzaglo, as well as key events at the prison. The series focuses upon the Asulin family, modeled after the Tuizer family, whose story functions as the story-line running through the entire series. Asulin comes from a similar background to that of many of the prisoners. He understands and identifies with them. The new and more open manner in which he runs the prison has proven its success. Shown at the Jerusalem Film Fest, July 1999

Zur Hadasim

TITLE: Zur Hadasim
YEAR: 1999
DIR/PROD: Gideon Kolirin
COUNTRY: Israel
LANGUAGE: Hebrew with English ST
TIME: 100
SOURCE: Zur Hadasim Productions, Tel Aviv
TEXT: Etti just can't believe it when the nurse gives her the positive result. But the nurse insists and Etti stops doubting and begins dreaming about the future. While she's at the clinic finding out she's pregnant, her cool boyfriend Shaul decides to buy the car, and oh is it one hell of a car. Truth is, Shaul could explain to Etti that there was a problem, but because of the look she gets in her eyes whenever she talks about their baby, he doesn't succeed in making the matter clear to her. So he's left with this problem, which is why he decides to go to the Armenian, who offers to solve the problem with Etti and fix up his life in a big way too. But while Shaul and the Armenian are cooking up their scheme, Adi and Ilana also make a plan that's supposed to straighten out their own screwed-up lives. Adi and Ilana don't really have anything to do with Shaul and Etti's story, but when their plan gets messed up, things also go haywire for Shaul and Etti. "There's hope and then there's circumstance. Say you'd like to date a girl and she's interested, then there's hope. If her grandfather dies exactly on the day you call her, that's circumstance. The problem is that you can't always know if it's the hopes or the circumstances that are to blame." (somebody). Stars Danny Shtag, Orli Ben Garty, Dafna Rechter, Albert Iluz. Shown at the Jerusalem Film Fest, July 1999

Courage to Care

TITLE: Courage to Care
YEAR: 1985
DIR/PROD: Robert A Gardner / Carol Rittner(RSM) and Sondra Myers
COUNTRY: USA
LANGUAGE: English
TIME: 28
SOURCE: Zenger Video, 10200 Jefferson Blvd., Room 902, P.O.Box 802, Culver City, CA 90232-0802; 800-421-4246. #ADL150V.
TEXT: Nominated for The Best Short Subject Documentary Academy Award in 1986. (Award Went to Witness To War). This documentary film encounters ordinary people who refused to succumb to Nazi tyranny and reached out to help victims of the Holocaust. Recommended for middle school pupils.

Quest for the ten lost tribes of Israel

TITLE: Quest for the ten lost tribes of Israel
YEAR: 1999
DIR/PROD: Simcha Jacobovici
COUNTRY: Canada
LANGUAGE: English
TIME:
SOURCE: Associated Producers, Toronto.
TEXT: Winner of the Hot Docs Fest in Toronto, 1999. To be broadcast by A&E. The idea for this documentary started in 1983 when Jacobovici filmed "Falasha." According to history, the ten tribes of the northern kingdom were carried away to Assyria in 721 BCE, but some say the remnants of some tribes exist in Ethiopia or on the India-Burmeseborder. Therefore Simcha goes on a quest to the Khyber Pass, India, Tunisia, and Uzbekistan. Isn't the Khyber Pass the English name for the Habor Pass in the Bible? Doesn't the name of the Efriti tribe there sound like "Ephraim? And next to the Efriti area is Yusuf-sai; Gad-un; Rubeni, and Shin-wari... A crew member gets arrested in Burma. And what about the Tunisian warrior queen, La Kahena, a Jewish Berber, who defended Tunisia from Islamic onslaughts. The film includes dissenters, such as Rivka Gonen (Israel Museum) and Haim Tadmor (Assyriologist).

TITLE:
YEAR: 1999
DIR/PROD:
COUNTRY: USA
LANGUAGE:
TIME:
SOURCE:
TEXT: Shown at the Jerusalem Film Fest, July 1999

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